Liz Earle Cleanse and Polish Hot Cloth Cleanser

Skin is left feeling soft, clean but never dry. The plastic pump bottle is great for travel

Price: £12.25 for the 100ml starter kit with two cloths; 100ml on its own, £10.75, travel size, 30ml: £4.50

Muslin cloths also sold separately, £3 for a pack of two, £7.50 for a pack of six.

Stockists: www.lizearle.com Customer centre - 01983 813 913

Launched: 8th March 1996

Tested: 2004 and January 2008

One of the best cleansers there is. I love it. You use it in three stages: massage it all over face, even your eyes. It cleanses your face of dirt and make up. Massage is very good for the skin and it’s almost impossible to overdo if you just use your own fingers (i.e. no brushes or other scrubby devices). Then you rinse out the linen face cloth that comes with the cleanser in hand hot water and use it to remove the product – that’s your exfoliation done. Then you splash with cool water. This last bit is the only bit I disagree with in that I wouldn’t, personally, change the temperature of the water because I think it can lead to broken veins if you’re a bit sensitive. But it’s up to you. The cool water feels nice. Skin is left feeling soft, clean but never dry. The plastic pump bottle is great for travel.

Ingredients:

Aqua
Caprylic / capric triglyceride
Theobroma cacao (cocoa) seed butter
Cetearyl alcohol
Cettyl esters
Sorbitan stearate
Polysorbate 60
Glycerine
Cera alba (beeswax)
Propylene glycol
Humulus lupulus(hops) extract
Panthenol
Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary) extract
Anthemis nobilis (chamomile) extract
Prunus amygdalus dulcis (sweet almond) extract
Eucalyptus globules (eucalyptus) oil
Limonene
Citric acid
Sodium hydroxide
Phenoxyethanol
Benzoic acid
Ethylhexylglycerin
Dehydroacetic acid
Polyaminopropyl biguanide

Annalisa Barbieri was in fashion PR for five years before going to the Observer to be fashion assistant. She has worked for the Evening Standard and the Times and was one of the fashion editors on the Independent on Sunday for five years, where she wrote the Dear Annie column. She was fishing correspondent of the Independent from 1997-2004.
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Voters are turning against Brexit but the Lib Dems aren't benefiting

Labour's pro-Brexit stance is not preventing it from winning the support of Remainers. Will that change?

More than a year after the UK voted for Brexit, there has been little sign of buyer's remorse. The public, including around a third of Remainers, are largely of the view that the government should "get on with it".

But as real wages are squeezed (owing to the Brexit-linked inflationary spike) there are tentative signs that the mood is changing. In the event of a second referendum, an Opinium/Observer poll found, 47 per cent would vote Remain, compared to 44 per cent for Leave. Support for a repeat vote is also increasing. Forty one per cent of the public now favour a second referendum (with 48 per cent opposed), compared to 33 per cent last December. 

The Liberal Democrats have made halting Brexit their raison d'être. But as public opinion turns, there is no sign they are benefiting. Since the election, Vince Cable's party has yet to exceed single figures in the polls, scoring a lowly 6 per cent in the Opinium survey (down from 7.4 per cent at the election). 

What accounts for this disparity? After their near-extinction in 2015, the Lib Dems remain either toxic or irrelevant to many voters. Labour, by contrast, despite its pro-Brexit stance, has hoovered up Remainers (55 per cent back Jeremy Corbyn's party). 

In some cases, this reflects voters' other priorities. Remainers are prepared to support Labour on account of the party's stances on austerity, housing and education. Corbyn, meanwhile, is a eurosceptic whose internationalism and pro-migration reputation endear him to EU supporters. Other Remainers rewarded Labour MPs who voted against Article 50, rebelling against the leadership's stance. 

But the trend also partly reflects ignorance. By saying little on the subject of Brexit, Corbyn and Labour allowed Remainers to assume the best. Though there is little evidence that voters will abandon Corbyn over his EU stance, the potential exists.

For this reason, the proposal of a new party will continue to recur. By challenging Labour over Brexit, without the toxicity of Lib Dems, it would sharpen the choice before voters. Though it would not win an election, a new party could force Corbyn to soften his stance on Brexit or to offer a second referendum (mirroring Ukip's effect on the Conservatives).

The greatest problem for the project is that it lacks support where it counts: among MPs. For reasons of tribalism and strategy, there is no emergent "Gang of Four" ready to helm a new party. In the absence of a new convulsion, the UK may turn against Brexit without the anti-Brexiteers benefiting. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.