Six oddities from the TPA's tax plan

All in all, a slightly strange report.

It turns out the plan of reading the TPA's tax report in full and only then writing on it, while possibly commendable in pursuit of accuracy, is probably not the best thing to do from a journalistic point of view. Many of the best pieces have already been written, particularly Nick Pearce, Tony Dolphin and Daniel Elton's. Nonetheless, there are sufficient oddities that are worth noting for a quick round-up post. In no particular order:

1. Inheritance tax isn't mentioned in the inheritance tax chapter

This one really is just a bit odd. Chapter six is titled Transaction, wealth and inheritance taxes should be abolished. But inheritance taxes are mentioned just once, in the context of an argument against a proposed measure of paying wealth taxes. Their abolition is never proposed, and no arguments are given as to why they are wrong.

But in chapter five, Taxes on capital and labour income disguised as business taxes should be abolished and replaced with a tax on distributed income (snappy titles throughout), there's a five page discussion as to why inheritance tax is so unpopular. I'm not sure what happened with the editing, but it's all very confusing.

2. The Biblical and Quranic arguments for low taxes

Apparently:

It might be argued that God endowed humans with certain inalienable rights, including personal freedom, and that taxation breaches those rights. [Page 98]

Also:

There is no morality in taking someone’s wealth and giving it to another. Such redistribution of wealth is about controlling society, not about helping others. [Page 103]

3. Pigovian taxes

Pigovian/Pigou/externality taxes are something we've covered before. The short version is that some activities affect people beyond those voluntarily partaking in them (creating an "externality"), and that economic efficiency is restored if a government imposes the cost of the externality on the person gaining the benefit from the activity.

The classic example is climate change. Burning a barrel of oil may bring me benefit, but it also causes damage to the planet. The Stern report put the damage at roughly $80 a barrel, and so anyone burning that much oil for less than $80 benefit is, netted out, destroying value. A carbon tax at that level would thus ensure that only oil which was economically beneficial was burned.

The commissioners don't like taxes, though, even economically watertight ones. In the chapter externalities rarely justify taxes as high as they are already, let alone higher, they argue that fuel duty should be cut, and tobacco and air passenger duty should be abolished. All good; although climate change is one of the biggest dangers facing the British economy in the long term, it makes sense to institute a carbon tax with a broad base, rather than focusing the costs on selected industries.

Except they don't argue for that. In fact, they don't argue for any form of carbon tax. Instead, two red herrings are put out. Firstly, that no tax on externalities can raise revenue and change behaviour at the same time (which is true, and something some supporters of the Robin Hood tax would do well to accept), and secondly that many taxes on externalities hit the poor hardest (which is true, but that's why carbon taxes are normally combined with a healthy redistributive element).

If you are ripping up the tax code and starting again, the very first thing that should be introduced is an effective, accurately priced, and properly enforced carbon tax. Doing so would render every other measure to fight climate change superfluous. The failure to take advantage of that ability implies that either the commission rejects any new tax out of hand, or embodies the worst of denialism.

4. If we assume that low taxes drive economic growth then we can see that lowering taxes will drive economic growth.

The commission uses the Centre for Economic and Business Research's dynamic model of the UK economy. We've addressed dynamic modelling before, particularly the often one-sided approach of assuming tax cuts will lead to more work and higher compliance while not making similar assumptions about spending, but the commissioners take the biscuit. They alter the model "based on [uncited] research into the impact of tax on the economy" such that it exaggerates the effect cutting tax will have on business investment, labour supply and net exports. Needless to say, if you build a model around the assumption that cutting tax drives business investment, it is not a massive achievement to then prove that cutting tax drives business investment. Tony Dolphin goes into more detail on this concern for Prospect.

This circular argument recurs many times throughout the report. Take page 76, for instance:

Peter and Mary are at school in very similar countries. At the moment, Peter’s country provides money to buy whatever teachers in state education request. The schools are well-equipped with the latest technology and buildings are refurbished frequently. In Mary’s country, there is stricter control over spending, the technology in schools is adequate, and buildings are only refurbished when they get shabby. The tax burden is therefore lower in Mary’s country, and the rate of economic growth is slightly higher.

Others may argue that the rate of growth will be higher in a country with a well-funded education system. But that doesn't get a look-in, even though, as Nick Pearce shows, the argument that low taxes lead to high growth is dubious.

5. Sexy, sexy low taxes

Political Scrapbook caught this with alarming speed, but Matt Ridley's section on the evolutionary psychology of low taxes is just bizarre:

Even in an age of working women, sexual continence and gender equality, the man with the most money still gets more sexual opportunities than the man with the least money. Ask them.

So no wonder we dislike inequality. No wonder we want tax to take that money off a Vanderbilt before he grabs all the best women. . .

[Support for taxation is] at least partly plain old sexual jealousy at the root.

Interestingly, there is no mention of the fact that, as well as being a Doctor of Zoology, Matt Ridley is also the Fifth Viscount Ridley, former chairman of Northern Rock. It doesn't take a foray into dodgy evolutionary psychology to work out why he might be in favor of lower taxes.

6. The lack of blue-sky thinking

The oddest thing about the report is how staid it is. Despite all the quirks throughout, its final conclusion – lower most taxes, scrap some – manages to be almost exactly what everyone expected when the commission was announced. Where is the genuinely innovative thinking? They missed the chance to call for a carbon tax, which would necessitate far less spending combating global warming; they missed the chance to call for legalisation and taxation of drugs; they could have taken on some of the right's darlings of spending, such as defence (5.7 per cent of expenditure) or crime and punishment (4.7 per cent) in order to justify their revenue cuts; and they decided against recommending taxation of wealth or land, focusing mainly on the fairness aspects.

It's this final point that really implies that this was a report written with a conclusion already in mind from the start. Which is depressing, because a real discussion of what a tax system drawn from scratch would be like is sorely overdue.

Jesus throws out the moneylenders. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Why Barack Obama was right to release Chelsea Manning

A Presidential act of mercy is good for Manning, but also for the US.

In early 2010, a young US military intelligence analyst on an army base near Baghdad slipped a Lady Gaga CD into a computer and sang along to the music. In fact, the soldier's apparently upbeat mood hid two facts. 

First, the soldier later known as Chelsea Manning was completely alienated from army culture, and the callous way she believed it treated civilians in Iraq. And second, she was quietly erasing the music on her CDs and replacing it with files holding explosive military data, which she would release to the world via Wikileaks. 

To some, Manning is a free speech hero. To others, she is a traitor. President Barack Obama’s decision to commute her 35-year sentence before leaving office has been blasted as “outrageous” by leading Republican Paul Ryan. Other Republican critics argue Obama is rewarding an act that endangered the lives of soldiers and intelligence operatives while giving ammunition to Russia. 

They have a point. Liberals banging the drum against Russia’s leak offensive during the US election cannot simultaneously argue leaks are inherently good. 

But even if you think Manning was deeply misguided in her use of Lady Gaga CDs, there are strong reasons why we should celebrate her release. 

1. She was not judged on the public interest

Manning was motivated by what she believed to be human rights abuses in Iraq, but her public interest defence has never been tested. 

The leaks were undoubtedly of public interest. As Manning said in the podcast she recorded with Amnesty International: “When we made mistakes, planning operations, innocent people died.” 

Thanks to Manning’s leak, we also know about the Vatican hiding sex abuse scandals in Ireland, plus the UK promising to protect US interests during the Chilcot Inquiry. 

In countries such as Germany, Canada and Denmark, whistle blowers in sensitive areas can use a public interest defence. In the US, however, such a defence does not exist – meaning it is impossible for Manning to legally argue her actions were in the public good. 

2. She was deemed worse than rapists and murderers

Her sentence was out of proportion to her crime. Compare her 35-year sentence to that received by William Millay, a young police officer, also in 2013. Caught in the act of trying to sell classified documents to someone he believed was a Russian intelligence officer, he was given 16 years

According to Amnesty International: “Manning’s sentence was much longer than other members of the military convicted of charges such as murder, rape and war crimes, as well as any others who were convicted of leaking classified materials to the public.”

3. Her time in jail was particularly miserable 

Manning’s conditions in jail do nothing to dispel the idea she has been treated extraordinarily harshly. When initially placed in solitary confinement, she needed permission to do anything in her cell, even walking around to exercise. 

When she requested treatment for her gender dysphoria, the military prison’s initial response was a blanket refusal – despite the fact many civilian prisons accept the idea that trans inmates are entitled to hormones. Manning has attempted suicide several times. She finally received permission to receive gender transition surgery in 2016 after a hunger strike

4. Julian Assange can stop acting like a martyr

Internationally, Manning’s continued incarceration was likely to do more harm than good. She has said she is sorry “for hurting the US”. Her worldwide following has turned her into an icon of US hypocrisy on free speech.

Then there's the fact Wikileaks said its founder Julian Assange would agree to be extradited to the US if Manning was released. Now that Manning is months away from freedom, his excuses for staying in the Equadorian London Embassy to avoid Swedish rape allegations are somewhat feebler.  

As for the President - under whose watch Manning was prosecuted - he may be leaving his office with his legacy in peril, but with one stroke of his pen, he has changed a life. Manning, now 29, could have expected to leave prison in her late 50s. Instead, she'll be free before her 30th birthday. And perhaps the Equadorian ambassador will finally get his room back. 

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.