Jeb Bush endorses Mitt Romney

Mitt Romney's good week just got better with a coveted endorsement from former Florida governor Jeb Bush.

The brother and son of former presidents George W. Bush and George H.W. Bush said that now is the time for Republican voters to "to unite behind Governor Romney and take our message of fiscal conservatism and job creation to all voters this fall."

This week, Romney has won primary elections in both Puerto Rico and Illinois, expanding his lead over Rick Santorum by 60 delegates and putting him 300 delegates ahead of the former Senator. Romney has now amassed a total of 563 delegates out of the 1,144 needed to clinch the Republican nomination and take on President Obama in November's general election.

Jeb Bush, who spent eight years as the governor of Florida, from 1998 to 2006, is a Republican heavyweight whom many assumed would enter the nomination race. His father, former President George H.W. Bush, also endorsed Romney in December.

Romney has the most endorsements in the race from elected officials, including former governors Tim Pawlenty and Jon Huntsman, both of whom dropped out of the nomination fight. He also boasts an endorsement from New Jersey governor Chris Christie, whom many Republicans also hoped would throw his hat in the ring.

Fellow wannabe nominees Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul have, however, vowed to stay in the race, with Gingrich's spokesman, R.C. Hammond, reportedly stating that Bush's endorsement is merely the "the completion of the establishment trifecta", in reference to Bush's father and former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole.

 

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Britain is running out of allies as it squares up to Russia

For whatever reason, Donald Trump is going to be no friend of an anti-Russia foreign policy.

The row over Donald Trump and that dossier rumbles on.

Nothing puts legs on a story like a domestic angle, and that the retired spy who compiled the file is a one of our own has excited Britain’s headline writers. The man in question, Christopher Steele, has gone to ground having told his neighbour to look after his cats before vanishing.

Although the dossier contains known errors, Steele is regarded in the intelligence community as a serious operator not known for passing on unsubstantiated rumours, which is one reason why American intelligence is investigating the claims.

“Britain's role in Trump dossier” is the Telegraph’s splash, “The ‘credible’ ex-MI6 man behind Trump Russia report” is the Guardian’s angle, “British spy in hiding” is the i’s splash.

But it’s not only British headline writers who are exercised by Mr Steele; the Russian government is too. “MI6 officers are never ex,” the Russian Embassy tweeted, accusing the UK of “briefing both ways - against Russia and US President”. “Kremlin blames Britain for Trump sex storm” is the Mail’s splash.

Elsewhere, Crispin Blunt, the chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, warns that relations between the United Kingdom and Russia are as “bad as they can get” in peacetime.

Though much of the coverage of the Trump dossier has focused on the eyecatching claims about whether or not the President-Elect was caught in a Russian honeytrap, the important thing, as I said yesterday, is that the man who is seven days from becoming President of the United States, whether through inclination or intimidation, is not going to be a reliable friend of the United Kingdom against Russia.

Though Emanuel Macron might just sneak into the second round of the French presidency, it still looks likely that the final choice for French voters will be an all-Russia affair, between Francois Fillon and Marine Le Pen.

For one reason or another, Britain’s stand against Russia looks likely to be very lonely indeed.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.