Cameron's US visit: in photos

Eating hotdogs, watching the game, flying on Air Force One, the usual... The PM visits Barack Obama.

Cameron's US visit appears to have been made up of a series of photo opportunities. Above, David Cameron and Barack Obama eat hot dogs while watching a basketball game.

Cameron

Here they are sitting in the stands at the same game, which took place at the University of Dayton Arena in Dayton Ohio.

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Obama greets enthusiastic fans after the game, while Cameron looks on. (You can watch a video of the rather awkward incident here).

Air Force One Cameron

This is the money shot: Cameron and Obama stepping off Air Force One as they arrive in Ohio. Breathless commentary yesterday made much of the fact that Cameron is the first non-US leader to go on board the iconic plane with Obama.

cameron obama

Looks like a shared romantic moment, but actually isn't. Here, Obama and Cameron walk towards Marine One before travelling from Washington to Ohio.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.