Is Sarah Palin planning a late bid?

Former Governor of Alaska promises to do “whatever I could to help”.

Sarah Palin has thrust herself back into the spotlight by claiming she could yet play an integral role in the Republican presidential nomination race. What exactly that role will entail is unclear but it seems Palin may be willing to run at a later date.

She said that in the event of a brokered convention, a situation whereby no candidate amasses enough delegates to win outright, she would "do whatever she could to help".

In an interview on Fox News, her offer was met with a tepid response from interviewer Eric Bolling.

Palin - For one, I think that it could get to that. ... If it had to be closed up today, the whole nominating process, then we could be looking at a brokered convention. ... Nobody is quite there yet, so I think that months from now, if that is the case, all bets are off as to who it will be, willing to offer up themselves up in their name in service to their country. I would do whatever I could to help

Bolling - That's, that's fantastic.

We all wait with bated breath for the specifics of her offer. (Go to 13:25 to see more)

 

Rob Pollard is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @_robpollard

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David Cameron: "Taking more and more refugees" is not the answer to the migration crisis

As the migrant crisis worsens, the Prime Minister refuses to allow desperate people into Britain, citing "peace" in the Middle East as his priority.

David Cameron says "taking more and more refugees" is not the answer to the global migration crisis.

Amid calls for the UK to allow more people in, to help ease the record numbers of migrants entering Europe and to provide asylum for desperate people attempting to cross the border, the Prime Minister insists upon keeping the UK's doors closed.

Preferring to focus on the situation in the Middle East, Cameron commented:

We are taking action across the board... the most important thing is to try to bring peace and stability to that part of the world . . . I don't think there is an answer that can be achieved simply by taking more and more refugees.

His words come on the day that harrowing photos of a young Syrian boy, washed up dead on a beach near the Turkish resort of Bodrum, have been published. The child was from a group of 12 Syrian refugees who drowned attempting to reach Greece.

The Labour leadership candidates are taking a different stance. In a much-praised speech this week, Yvette Cooper urged the UK to take in 10,000 more refugees, warning that a failure to do so would be, “cowardly, immoral and not the British way”.

Andy Burnham too has called for Britain to take more people in (or, in his words, "share the burden"): "This is a humanitarian crisis, not just a tedious inconvenience for British holidaymakers, as our government might have us believe."

Now read this week's leader on the migration crisis, "The wretched of the earth", calling for the UK to accept more asylum seekers

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.