How Fox News hid the fall in unemployment

News channel's graph ignores fall in unemployment from 9 per cent to 8.6 per cent.

At first sight, it might seem as if there's nothing wrong with this Fox News graph on US unemployment. But take another look and you'll notice that the figure for November (8.6 per cent) appears to be no lower than that for October (9 per cent) and significantly higher than that for March (8.8 per cent). The US labour market is improving but you wouldn't know it from Fox's chart. The message is that it's stagnation all the way.

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Were it not for Fox's history of distortion, one could write this off as an honest mistake. But as Media Matters notes, "A few weeks ago, when the Bureau of Labor Statistics first reported that the unemployment rate had dropped to 8.6 percent in November -- the lowest rate in more than 2 years -- a Fox News graphic rounded up to 9 per cent."

For the record, here's what an accurate representation of the figures looks like:

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But don't expect to see that graph on Fox anytime soon.

Hat-tip: Media Matters.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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David Cameron: "Taking more and more refugees" is not the answer to the migration crisis

As the migrant crisis worsens, the Prime Minister refuses to allow desperate people into Britain, citing "peace" in the Middle East as his priority.

David Cameron says "taking more and more refugees" is not the answer to the global migration crisis.

Amid calls for the UK to allow more people in, to help ease the record numbers of migrants entering Europe and to provide asylum for desperate people attempting to cross the border, the Prime Minister insists upon keeping the UK's doors closed.

Preferring to focus on the situation in the Middle East, Cameron commented:

We are taking action across the board... the most important thing is to try to bring peace and stability to that part of the world . . . I don't think there is an answer that can be achieved simply by taking more and more refugees.

His words come on the day that harrowing photos of a young Syrian boy, washed up dead on a beach near the Turkish resort of Bodrum, have been published. The child was from a group of 12 Syrian refugees who drowned attempting to reach Greece.

The Labour leadership candidates are taking a different stance. In a much-praised speech this week, Yvette Cooper urged the UK to take in 10,000 more refugees, warning that a failure to do so would be, “cowardly, immoral and not the British way”.

Andy Burnham too has called for Britain to take more people in (or, in his words, "share the burden"): "This is a humanitarian crisis, not just a tedious inconvenience for British holidaymakers, as our government might have us believe."

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.