Joe the Plumber to run for Congress

The everyman who became the hero of rightwing America hopes to enter House of Representatives.

It's been three years since Samuel Joseph Wurzelbacher, the Ohio man dubbed "Joe the Plumber", hurtled into the public eye after berating then-presidential candidate Barack Obama on tax policy. Now, the man who was referred to more than two dozen times during 2008's presidential debates had announced that he is running for Congress.

After his five-minutes of fame, Wurzelbacher became something of an icon for anti-establishment Republicans, touring the country to speak at Tea Party events. He was seen as everyman, the representative of hardworking America (although it later emerged that he was not a licensed plumber). Not one to miss a trick, he's also secured a book deal and recorded a country music record. He announced yesterday that he will run as Republican candidate for the House of Representatives in Ohio's 9th Congressional District, which includes the city of Toledo.

In his announcement, he said:

If I'm coming off as angry, it's because I am. I just can't stand it when people do bad work. And we've been voting, the last 40 or 50 years, (for) bad people to do bad things to us. Why have we been doing it? Because we don't take our civic responsibility seriously enough.

His new campaign website, Joeforcongress2012.com, promises that he will be "a fierce advocate for working class, conservative values" in Washington. Wurzelbacher has previously been dismissive of politics as a whole, and said that he'd decided to enter as a Republican because he didn't think he could win as an independent. "Is it the lesser of two evils?" he said. "I don't know."

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.