Rick Perry stumbles on Pakistan question

Republican frontrunner struggles to answer question on Pakistan and nuclear weapons.

Last night's Republican debate in Orlando was most notable for Rick Perry's inept response to a question on Pakistan. Asked how he would respond if he received a phone call at 3am telling him that Pakistan had lost control of its nuclear weapons, the frontrunner for the Republican nomination mumbled something about building a "relationship in the region" before criticising the US for not selling more arms to Pakistan's nuclear rival India:

"When we had the opportunity to sell India the upgraded F-16s we chose not to do that. We did the same thing with Taiwain. The point is, our allies need to understand clearly that we are their friends, we will be standing by there with them. Today we don't have those allies in that region".

In fact, as rival candidate Rick Santorum said: "Working with allies at that point is the last thing we want to do. We want to work in that country to make sure the problem is defused". Just as embarrassing was Perry's reference to Pakistan as "the Pakistani country".

True, the question was a hypothetical one but this was an issue on which the Texas governor needed to display some heft. And he failed to do so. Kansas governor Sam Brownback, a Perry supporter, later told the Weekly Standard: "I thought the initial response was accurate ... You gotta have a relationship to know what's going on. I've worked with the Pakistanis, and particularly in Pakistan you need a relationship, because the country's a pretty unstable place, and it's run by the army. You gotta know the guy that's the head of the place."

So that's all clear then.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

A second referendum? Photo: Getty
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Will there be a second EU referendum? Petition passes 1.75 million signatures

Updated: An official petition for a second EU referendum has passed 1.75m signatures - but does it have any chance of happening?

A petition calling for another EU referendum has passed 1.75 million signatures

"We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the remain or leave vote is less than 60% based a turnout less than 75% there should be another referendum," the petition reads. Overall, the turnout in the EU referendum on 23 June was 73 per cent, and 51.8 per cent of voters went for Leave.

The petition has been so popular it briefly crashed the government website, and is now the biggest petition in the site's history.

After 10,000 signatures, the government has to respond to an official petition. After 100,000 signatures, it must be considered for a debate in parliament. 

Nigel Farage has previously said he would have asked for a second referendum based on a 52-48 result in favour of Remain.

However, what the petition is asking for would be, in effect, for Britain to stay as a member of the EU. Turnout of 75 per cent is far higher than recent general elections, and a margin of victory of 20 points is also ambitious. In the 2014 independence referendum in Scotland, the split was 55-45 in favour of remaining in the union. 

Unfortunately for those dismayed by the referendum result, even if the petition is debated in parliament, there will be no vote and it will have no legal weight. 

Another petition has been set up for London to declare independence, which has attracted 130,000 signatures.