Obama impersonator cut short at GOP bash

"He was born in Hawaii," he went on. "Or as the Tea Partiers like to call it, Kenya."

Oh dear. A comedian hired to entertain Republican activists at their Leadership Conference in New Orleans this weekend has been making headlines for all the wrong reasons.

Obama impersonator Reggie Brown had to be escorted from the stage mid-way through his act after some jokes which were considered rather racially inappropriate.

Many delegates were left bewildered as Brown made fun of the President's family background: referring to his white mother and black father, he said that while Michelle Obama liked to celebrate the whole of Black History month -- her husband only celebrated half.

"He was born in Hawaii," he went on. "Or as the Tea Partiers like to call it, Kenya."

The routine went on to mock the leading Republican presidential hopefuls, including digs at Mitt Romney's Mormon faith, before he was cut short.

The party strategist and former communications director Doug Heye revealed his discomfort onTwitter:

Wonder why many minorities have problems with GOP? Our fault.

You can see Brown's truncated routine here

 

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Nineties boyband 5ive pull out of pro-Brexit concert, after learning it was “political”

“As a band, Five have no political allegiances.”

I woke up today with this feeling that better things are coming my way. One of those better things was Leave.EU’s BPop Live, the bizarre pro-Brexit concert at the NEC arena in Birmingham. With a line-up including Nineties stars 5ive, Alesha Dixon and East 17, as well as speeches from Nigel Farage, Dr Liam Fox and Kate Hoey, it was sure to be deliciously awkward fun.

But those halcyon days were over as soon as they began. Reports are now circling that the two original members of 5ive who had signed up to the gig, Ritchie Neville and Scott Robinson, have cancelled their appearance after realising that this was, in fact, a political concert.

A spokesperson told the Mirror:

When Rich and Scott agreed to play the event they understood that it was a pop concert funded by one of the Brexit organisations and not a political rally.

Ah, one of those non-political Brexit-funded concerts, then.

As it has come to light that this is more a political rally with entertainment included they have both decided to cancel their involvement. They would like to make it clear that as a band Five have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.

5ive have no political allegiance. They are lone wolves, making their way in this world with nothing but a thirst for vigilante justice. 5ive are the resident president, the 5th element. They know no allegiances. (Also, it’s 5ive with a 5, I will have it no other way.)

Their allegiance is first and foremost to their fans.

Ok, I’m tearing up now. I pledge allegiance to the band

A divide between two members of the Nineties’ best-loved boybands is terrifying to imagine. They must have felt like they should have been screaming, trying to get through to their friends. Sometimes, it feels that life has no meaning, but, if I know 5ive, things will be alright in the end. For who else can truly get on up, when they’re down?

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.