Ed Miliband: tough on parasites

In an interview with the Daily Telegraph, the Labour leader talks about reforming capitalism - and practises a little pest control.

Today's Daily Telegraph carries an interview with Ed Miliband, written by former editor Charles Moore. In it, the Labour leader expands on one of the themes he explored in the New Statesman last week: his plan to "remake capitalism".

He tells Moore:

'I am now much clearer than I was two years ago about the depth of change we need. . . Tony and Gordon were products of their historical circumstances.’ They had to break with the past, but in the process, New Labour became too credulous about business: 'The consensus around regulation ['light touch’] turned out to be really problematic.’ The project became 'too easy and accepting’ about globalisation: 'It’s just not true that all the top CEOs will leave the country unless we pay them whatever they demand’.

The interview picks up on some concrete policy proposals: there is a "strong case" for making takeovers more difficult, and ordinary employees should be represented on the committees which decide executive pay. Miliband also believes that there are too few banks and that the "big six" energy companies have a stranglehold on supply. He adds that wealth is created by "the private sector working with the government. We shouldn't be ashamed of wanting an industrial policy".

Miliband is careful to reassure Telegraph readers that a top 50% tax rate is the limit for him and that it's fine to be rich "if you make it the hard way".

He also manages to swat a mosquito which has settled on Charles Moore's shoulder:

With a commanding show of decision, Mr Miliband squashes it, spattering its remarkably copious blood over my light grey suit. So that’s how he deals with capitalist parasites.

Perhaps he's been taking tips from Barack Obama:

 

Ed Miliband: "It's just not true that CEOs will leave unless we pay them whatever they demand". Photo: Getty

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

Photo: Getty
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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.