Article of the week!

Short, but perfectly formed

So I might have overblown it slightly. But still, this is great. And for a Friday afternoon, it's PERFECT.

From the UB Post in Mongolia: "City Championship for Barbers and Beauticians".

It's a short piece. So I'm going to copy it out here in full:

A city's championship of hairdressers and beauticians will be held on October 9.

Participators (barbers and beauticians) will compete for nine events such as hairstyle for men and women, headdress of evening and elective haircut.
In the competition, participants will show transformation of face on the face and body. They will make manicures by gouache and brush.

Mongolian Union of Barbers and Manicurists announced that "In this year, participators can't use adhesive and inlay on the nail".
Last year, N Batmonkh, barber of Tserenkhand salon, won the first place in the championship and was awarded by Grandpre from International competition.

Where to begin? The "elective haircut"? "Headdress of evening"? (WHY AREN'T THERE PICTURES?) The ban on adhesives? (So controversial!) Or the greatest line of all: "participants will show transformation of face on the face and body". I'm sorry, what? What what what? Face on the face? Face on the body? Will there be faces in different parts of the body?

More importantly, I can't believe I missed the actual event. If anyone has pictures, please send.

 

 

Sophie Elmhirst is features editor of the New Statesman

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.