The sad story of Sumanto

If spinach be the food of love, read on

This morning we travel to Indonesia, courtesy of Papua New Guinea's Weekend Courier newspaper.

I think this might be my favourite story so far. I'm going to list the reasons why. I do like a list.

a) The protagonist is an ex-cannibal.

b) He's looking for love.

c) It contains the quote: I love meat... all types of meat as long as it's cooked. But I don't eat people any more. (Mostly spinach.)

I can see why some might not take to the plight of Sumanto. (He once dug up a corpse. And ate it.) But in the spirit of Second Chances, and New Beginnings, and generally supporting lonely, strange people the world over (one of the manifesto commitments of this blog - watch this space for further manifesto commitments as and when they occur to me), I'd like to suggest a general surge of goodwill in his direction. I also really like the idea of an ex-cannibal lonely hearts column. Surely My Single Friend could easily diversify into My Ex-Cannibal Neighbour?

Anyway, good luck to you, Sumanto. I hope you find love, and I hope that said love likes spinach (the greatest euphemism for flesh I've ever heard).

Sophie Elmhirst is features editor of the New Statesman

Photo: Getty Images/Carl Court
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Nigel Farage: welcoming refugees will lead to "migrant tide" of jihadists

Ukip's leader Nigel Farage claims that housing refugees will allow Isis to smuggle in "jihadists".

Nigel Farage has warned that granting sanctuary to refugees could result in Britain being influenced by Isis. 

In remarks that were immediately condemned online, the Ukip leader said "When ISIS say they will flood the migrant tide with 500,000 of their own jihadists, we'd better listen", before saying that Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor, had done something "very dangerous" in attempting to host refugees, saying that she was "compounding the pull factors" that lead migrants to attempt the treacherous Mediterranean crossing.

Farage, who has four children, said that as a father, he was "horrified" by the photographs of small children drowned on a European beach, but said housing more refugees would simply make the problem worse. 

The Ukip leader, who failed for the fifth successive occassion to be elected as an MP in May, said he welcomed the prospect of a Jeremy Corbyn victory, describing it as a "good result". Corbyn is more sceptical about the European Union than his rivals for the Labour leadership, which Farage believes will provide the nascent Out campaign with a boost. 

 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.