Digital erasure: how to avoid it happening to you

Mat Honan lost everything. Here's how to ensure you don't.

On Friday night, Mat Honan, a senior reporter for Gizmodo, got hacked. Hard:

At 4:50 PM, someone got into my iCloud account, reset the password and sent the confirmation message about the reset to the trash. . .

The backup email address on my Gmail account is that same .mac email address. At 4:52 PM, they sent a Gmail password recovery email to the .mac account. Two minutes later, an email arrived notifying me that my Google Account password had changed.

At 5:00 PM, they remote wiped my iPhone

At 5:01 PM, they remote wiped my iPad

At 5:05, they remote wiped my MacBook Air.

A few minutes after that, they took over my Twitter.

The full account of his travails is terrifying for anyone who lives a largely digital life. In fifteen minutes, Honan lost most of his digital property (photos, emails, documents and so on), and most of his ways of communicating with the outside world. Not just email and twitter, but phone calls, and text messages.

How it happened has only become clear since Friday, and presents a worrying picture of security at Apple. The initial breach, in Honan's iCloud account, was done by someone who successfully convinced Apple support to reset the password without knowing the original password, or any security questions associated with the account. Simply put, that should not be possible. From there, however, a series of easily made but unfortunate decisions allowed it to spiral out of control.

What's particularly scary about Honan's situation is that, in a number of ways, he followed best-practices. His iCloud account password was unique, alphanumeric, and never got leaked or cracked. Yet he still lost everything. But there are two things which may – just – have been able to improve the situation.

Back-ups

It sounds really simple, and you have in fact probably been told it before, but back-up. Back-up everything, and preferably back it up more than once. As Marco Arment says, if you can afford a MacBook Air, iPhone and iPad, you can definitely afford an external hard drive.

More importantly, don't confuse what are two separate services: back-up and syncing. If all your precious photos are stored on Dropbox or iCloud, that protects you against some types of data loss – dropping your laptop in the bath, that sort of thing – but not others. And frankly, most data loss these days isn't hardware or software failure but "wetware" – your brain. It's when you delete a file, and empty the trash, and only then realise that you actually really wanted to keep that piece of data (yes, I have done this (with my entire Applications folder (it hurts))). If you are using a backup service which deletes the backup when you delete the original, that's not a huge help. And even worse is that many of them will delete the original if you delete the backup.

This is especially useful if you have a service – like iCloud – which allows remote wiping. If you turn on a switch which allows all your data to be erased, it's probably worth making sure you have a plan in case you have to hit that switch. If you don't keep back-ups, turn that off.

Password resets

If you are sensible – and many people aren't – you'll have different passwords for every service. Honan did. The problem is that although that removes most possibilities for losing multiple accounts, it doesn't take away the weakest link. If Linked.In gets hacked, that password shouldn't be able to gain access to anything else, but if your email account is hacked, you may well be screwed. Most services are designed to allow anyone with a password or access to the registered email account ​to log-on. Making the former secure and then leaving the latter open is not the best move. So what's the best thing to do?

Step one is to make sure that the email address password resets go to is the most secure possible one. For most people who don't have extra-strong security needs, that means a Gmail account with two-step encryption. Every time you try to log-on from a new computer, you get sent a text (or check a special app) with a code to finish the log-in. Unless someone steals that as well, you're safe.

Step two is to remove password resets from that address. There's no point having a secure email address if you can reset the password by requesting it from a less secure one. Step three is to stop​ using it for anything but account registrations. It will be impossible to keep it totally secure, because of the number of services which still identify you by your address, but it's better than handing it out to everyone.

But the question that still remains is whether Apple and iCloud can be trusted at all. Following Honan's story, it certainly seems a bad idea to link any other accounts to your iCloud. Until the company responds, however, we can't know quite how bad it will be.

Update

Mat Honan has now made public just how the hack happened, and it's even scarier than we thought. There are severe security flaws in Amazon and Apple's password reset procedures that allow someone to take over both accounts with just your name, email address and billing address. This is not, by any stretch of the imagination, confidential data – yet until those procedures are changed, it would be best to treat it as such, and to attempt to limit the amount of damage which would happen if those accounts were compromised.

How to trick Amazon:

First you call Amazon and tell them you are the account holder, and want to add a credit card number to the account. All you need is the name on the account, an associated e-mail address, and the billing address. Amazon then allows you to input a new credit card. (Wired used a bogus credit card number from a website that generates fake card numbers that conform with the industry's published self-check algorithm.) Then you hang up.

Next you call back, and tell Amazon that you've lost access to your account. Upon providing a name, billing address, and the new credit card number you gave the company on the prior call, Amazon will allow you to add a new e-mail address to the account. From here, you go to the Amazon website, and send a password reset to the new e-mail account. This allows you to see all the credit cards on file for the account -- not the complete numbers, just the last four digits. But, as we know, Apple only needs those last four digits. We asked Amazon to comment on its security policy, but didn't have anything to share by press time.

Delete – even if you don't want to. Photograph: Cari McGee/www.carimcgee.com

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Scientists have finally said it: alcohol causes cancer

Enough of "linked" and "attributable": a new paper concludes that alcohol directly causes seven types of cancer.

I don't blame you if you switch off completely at the words "causes cancer". If you pay attention to certain publications, everything from sunbeds, to fish, to not getting enough sun, can all cause cancer. But this time, it's worth listening.

The journal Addiction has published a paper that makes a simple, yet startling, claim: 

"Evidence can support the judgement that alcohol causes cancer of the oropharynx [part of the throat], larynx, oesophagus, liver, colon, rectum and [female] breast"

So what's especially significant about this? 

First, scientists, unlike journalists, are very wary of the word "causes". It's hard to ever prove that one action directly led to another, rather than that both happened to occur within the same scenario. And yet Jennie Connor, author of the paper and professor in the Preventive and Social Medicine department at the University of Otago, New Zealand, has taken the leap.

Second, alcohol not only causes cancer of one kind – the evidence supports the claim that it causes cancer at seven different sites in our bodies. There was weaker evidence that it may also cause skin, prostate and pancreatic cancer, while the link between mouth cancers and alcohol consumption was the strongest. 

What did we know about alcohol and cancer before?

Many, many studies have "linked" cancer to alcohol, or argued that some cases may be "attributable" to alcohol consumption. 

This paper loooks back over a decade's worth of research into alcohol and cancer, and Connor concludes that all this evidence, taken together, proves that alcohol "increases the incidence of [cancer] in the population".

However, as Connor notes in her paper, "alcohol’s causal role is perceived to be more complex than tobacco's", partly because we still don't know exactly how alcohol causes cancer at these sites. Yet she argues that the evidence alone is enough to prove the cause, even if we don't know exactly how the "biologial mechanisms" work. 

Does this mean that drinking = cancer, then?

No. A causal link doesn't mean one thing always leads to the other. Also, cancer in these seven sites was shown to have what's called a "dose-response" relationship, which means the more you drink, the more you increase your chances of cancer.

On the bright side, scientists have also found that if you stop drinking altogether, you can reduce your chances back down again.

Are moderate drinkers off the hook?

Nope. Rather devastatingly, Connor notes that moderate drinkers bear a "considerable" portion of the cancer risk, and that targeting only heavy drinkers with alcohol risk reduction campaigns would have "limited" impact. 

What does this mean for public health? 

This is the tricky bit. In the paper, Connor points out that, given what we know about lung cancer and tobacco, the general advice is simply not to smoke. Now, a strong link proven over years of research may suggest the same about drinking, an activity society views as a bit risky but generally harmless.

Yet in 2012, it's estimated that alcohol-attributable cancers killed half a million people, which made up 5.8 per cent of cancer deaths worldwide. As we better understand the links between the two, it's possible that this proportion may turn out to be a lot higher. 

As she was doing the research, Connor commented:

"We've grown up with thinking cancer is very mysterious, we don't know what causes it and it's frightening, so to think that something as ordinary as drinking is associated with cancer I think is quite difficult."

What do we do now?

Drink less. The one semi-silver lining in the study is that the quantity of alcohol you consume has a real bearing on your risk of developing these cancers. 

On a wider scale, it looks like we need to recalibrate society's perspective on drinking. Drug campaigners have long pointed out that alcohol, while legal, is one of the most toxic and harmful drugs available  an argument that this study will bolster.

In January, England's chief medical officer Sally Davies introduced some of the strictest guidelines on alcohol consumption in the world, and later shocked a parliamentary hearing by saying that drinking could cause breast cancer.

"I would like people to take their choice knowing the issues," she told the hearing, "And do as I do when I reach for my glass of wine and think... do I want to raise my risk of breast cancer?"

Now, it's beginning to look like she was ahead of the curve. 

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.