The most important question not asked at the presidential debate

"Mr President, if they say 'cut back', will you say 'fight back'?"

Due to the Labour conference – and it being published well after midnight UK time – we missed this yesterday, but Business Insider's Joe Weisenthal went pretty strong on the one question he wanted asked at Wednesday's presidential debate, which focused on domestic policy. Of course, it flies against prevailing wisdom, so there wasn't actually much hope it would make the cut, but it is still the most important economic question either of the candidates could answer:

The next President is likely to face politicians in the House and Senate demanding immediate spending cuts.

As Americans sit at home and worry about the durability of the recovery, which one of you can promise to the American people that they don't have to worry about austerity under your watch?

The answers would be interesting to hear, that's for sure – especially with that framing.

The candidates during the debate on Wednesday night. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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The NS Podcast #230: It's (New) Party Time

The New Statesman podcast.

Helen is joined by Anoosh to consider whether a new political party would have any chance of success in the UK. Then they discuss the TV shows everyone really likes to watch but doesn't admit to and analyse why the quality of Don't Tell The Bride has declined. Finally, a bumper You Asked Us section including listener questions on social care, punching Nazis, the Tory economic agenda and more.

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Further reading:

The NS centenary debate from 2013 - did the left win the twentieth century?

Meet the Ivanka Voter by Anne Helen Petersen on Buzzfeed.

Anoosh on the EDL.

Why is Love Island so Tory?

How Don't Tell the Bride lost its spark

Take Me Out and the failures of feminism by Alan White.