Michael Gove: I would vote to leave the EU

The education secretary has reportedly told friends that the UK has to be ready to threaten to leave the EU.

The Mail on Sunday has splashed today on the revelation that Michael Gove has apparently told friends that if a referendum were to be held, he would vote to take the UK out of the EU:

It's a bold headline, but inside the story is a bit softer - Gove has apparently told "close allies" that Britain needs to be ready to threaten to leave the EU altogether if it is going to renegotiate our relationship successfully.

Simon Walters says this intervention by the education secretary is part of an "anti-EU pincer movement" by Gove and Cameron. The latter is due to announce a pull-back from some EU justice measures later this mornth, Walters says.

On the face of it, "Tory cabinet minister doesn't like the EU" is hardly an earth-shaking revelation.

What's interesting, though, is that Tim Montgomerie of ConservativeHome says:

My estimation is that at least eight Tory Cabinet ministers would privately sign up to exactly that view.

If Montgomerie is right (and he often is about such things) and Gove is just one of a number of senior Tories having these thoughts, this story takes on a whole new dimension. Parliament returns tomorrow, so the next month or so will be an interesting one for the future of the UK's relationship with the EU.

Will the Lib Dems have anything to say about this?

Michael Gove during this year's Conservative Party conference. Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.