"Generals for hire" - yet another lobbying scandal

A Sunday Times investigation has secretly filmed former generals boasting about lobbying to win multi-million-pound defence deals for arms firms.

A Sunday Times investigation has secretly filmed top-ranking retired generals boasting about their lobbying ability when it comes to helping arms firms secure multi-million-pound defence contracts.

Individuals like Falklands war hero Lieutenant-General Sir John Kiszely, Lieutenant-General Richard Applegate and Lord Dannatt were filmed bragging about their access to ministers. Several said it was possible to "ignore" the rules banning recently retired service personnel from lobbying or deals that are in official "purdah".

One detail that stands out in particular is the fact that Lord Dannatt met the undercover journalists at his private lodging in the Tower of London - where the front door is guarded by a beefeater.

Defence secretary Philip Hammond has launched an investigation into the claims, saying the allegations are serious, but insisting that these retired generals wield "no influence". The individuals in question have denied wrongdoing.

It's another great undercover scoop by the Sunday Times, in the style of the sting that caught out former Conservative treasurer Peter Cruddas, who was filmed boasting that he could provide access to the prime minister in return for donations.

Whether or not serious wrongdoing is uncovered, the bragging of these generals (or the "galloping greed of the old warhorses" in the Sunday Times superb phrase) conforms to an overall impression that a lot of money and undue influence is wielded behind the scenes in Whitehall. The cloud under which former defence secretary Liam Fox left the department a year ago contributes to this.

David Cameron has repeatedly vowed to "clean up Parliament". The more stories like this emerge, the more people will doubt his ability, or even will, to keep that promise.


Former British Army head Richard Dannatt. Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman.

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Michael Gove definitely didn't betray anyone, says Michael Gove

What's a disagreement among friends?

Michael Gove is certainly not a traitor and he thinks Theresa May is absolutely the best leader of the Conservative party.

That's according to the cast out Brexiteer, who told the BBC's World At One life on the back benches has given him the opportunity to reflect on his mistakes. 

He described Boris Johnson, his one-time Leave ally before he decided to run against him for leader, as "phenomenally talented". 

Asked whether he had betrayed Johnson with his surprise leadership bid, Gove protested: "I wouldn't say I stabbed him in the back."

Instead, "while I intially thought Boris was the right person to be Prime Minister", he later came to the conclusion "he wasn't the right person to be Prime Minister at that point".

As for campaigning against the then-PM David Cameron, he declared: "I absolutely reject the idea of betrayal." Instead, it was a "disagreement" among friends: "Disagreement among friends is always painful."

Gove, who up to July had been a government minister since 2010, also found time to praise the person in charge of hiring government ministers, Theresa May. 

He said: "With the benefit of hindsight and the opportunity to spend some time on the backbenches reflecting on some of the mistakes I've made and some of the judgements I've made, I actually think that Theresa is the right leader at the right time. 

"I think that someone who took the position she did during the referendum is very well placed both to unite the party and lead these negotiations effectively."

Gove, who told The Times he was shocked when Cameron resigned after the Brexit vote, had backed Johnson for leader.

However, at the last minute he announced his candidacy, and caused an infuriated Johnson to pull his own campaign. Gove received just 14 per cent of the vote in the final contest, compared to 60.5 per cent for May. 


Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.