Is this the end for Andrew Mitchell?

Cabinet ministers tell Chief Whip that he should resign "for the good of his party".

Andrew Mitchell may have chosen to stay away from the Conservative conference, but his run-in with the police has still loomed large over the gathering. The Tories acknowledge that the affair has done lasting damage to the party's reputation, with a growing number of the view that the Chief Whip should fall on his sword. One cabinet minister tells the Telegraph: "It’s still doing a lot of harm and someone needs to put an end to it. There’s a chance that Andrew will do that himself, but people may have to talk to him."

At the same time, backbench MPs have written to Graham Brady, the chairman of the 1922 committee, to complain that Mitchell remains in post. Few now believe that he has the authority required to perform the role of Chief Whip. As David Davis shrewdly observed last week: "What does a Chief Whip have at his fingertips to deploy normally? Well, a mixture of charm, rewards, appeals to loyalty — all of those are diluted at the moment."

With the end of the conference season and the return of Parliament, Mitchell's future is likely to be resolved early next week. The chances of him resigning now appear at least as good as those of him surviving.

Chief Whip Andrew Mitchell did not attend this week's Conservative conference for fear of becoming a "distraction". Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Sadiq Khan gives Jeremy Corbyn's supporters a lesson on power

The London mayor doused the Labour conference with cold electoral truths. 

There was just one message that Sadiq Khan wanted Labour to take from his conference speech: we need to be “in power”. The party’s most senior elected politician hammered this theme as relentlessly as his “son of a bus driver” line. His obsessive emphasis on “power” (used 38 times) showed how far he fears his party is from office and how misguided he believes Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters are.

Khan arrived on stage to a presidential-style video lauding his mayoral victory (a privilege normally reserved for the leader). But rather than delivering a self-congratulatory speech, he doused the conference with cold electoral truths. With the biggest personal mandate of any British politician in history, he was uniquely placed to do so.

“Labour is not in power in the place that we can have the biggest impact on our country: in parliament,” he lamented. It was a stern rebuke to those who regard the street, rather than the ballot box, as the principal vehicle of change.

Corbyn was mentioned just once, as Khan, who endorsed Owen Smith, acknowledged that “the leadership of our party has now been decided” (“I congratulate Jeremy on his clear victory”). But he was a ghostly presence for the rest of the speech, with Khan declaring “Labour out of power will never ever be good enough”. Though Corbyn joined the standing ovation at the end, he sat motionless during several of the applause lines.

If Khan’s “power” message was the stick, his policy programme was the carrot. Only in office, he said, could Labour tackle the housing crisis, air pollution, gender inequality and hate crime. He spoke hopefully of "winning the mayoral elections next year in Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham", providing further models of campaigning success. 

Khan peroration was his most daring passage: “It’s time to put Labour back in power. It's time for a Labour government. A Labour Prime Minister in Downing Street. A Labour Cabinet. Labour values put into action.” The mayor has already stated that he does not believe Corbyn can fulfil this duty. The question left hanging was whether it would fall to Khan himself to answer the call. If, as he fears, Labour drifts ever further from power, his lustre will only grow.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.