Boris outflanks Cameron on school sport

Mayor calls for return of two-hours-a-week target scrapped by the government.

Boris Johnson's call for all school pupils to do two hours of sport a day, following the news that the government has scrapped the relevant target, is yet another example of him using his platform as Mayor of London to make a national intervention.

Here's what he told a press conference earlier today:

The government totally understands people's appetite for this, they can see the benefits of sport and what it does for young people.

They understand very, very clearly the social and economic advantages.

I would like to see, frankly, the kind of regime I used to enjoy - compulsory two hours' sport every day.

I've no doubt that is the sort of thing that would be wonderful for kids across this country.

It is of profound importance for the happiness and success of this country that we have more sport in schools.

David Cameron has defended the decision to abolish the target on the grounds that "if you just simply sit there in Whitehall and set a target but don't actually do anything to help schools meet it, you are not really solving the problem". He added: "By just saying 'Look, I want you to do this many hours a week' some schools think 'Right, as I've hit that minimum requirement, I've ticked the box and I can give up."

Yet, as ever, Boris has not missed an opportunity to kick Cameron while he's down. As Mayor of London he enjoys the luxury of being able to comment on national affairs with little fear of consequences, while the PM is constrained by the coalition, his own MPs and the government's deficit reduction plan. If today's intervention is a sign of things to come, the next three years could be very uncomfortable for Cameron.

David Cameron and London Mayor Boris Johnson cheer on athletes at the Olympic Games. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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