Vince Cable warned us about Bob Diamond

The business secretary expressed reservations about the Barclays chief on his appointment two years ago.

Here are a couple of remarks from Vince Cable.

"We are worried about this combination of the casinos and the traditional banking."

"Mr Diamond illustrates in a particularly graphic way what happens when you have an extremely high paid head of an investment bank taking over one of these major international banks."

They don’t seem especially unusual over the last few days do they? The sort of thing you might expect any politician to be saying at the moment. And of course they echo a sentiment that I suspect is shared by many today.

Only Vince didn’t say them yesterday. Nor indeed this week. He said them almost two years ago, on Bob Diamond’s initial appointment.

I know I’m partisan. But this does seem especially prescient, does it not? And not the sort of thing you’d expect George Osborne to say, or indeed be capable of saying.

Nor is it the first time he has been so discerning. Nor indeed, is it the second. In fact, it’s a bit of a habit.

And when it’s combined with the courage to ask the awkward questions – well, it’s the sort of judgement you’d want in a Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Isn't it?


Should we have listened to Vince? Photograph: Getty Images

Richard Morris blogs at A View From Ham Common, which was named Best New Blog at the 2011 Lib Dem Conference

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Michael Gove definitely didn't betray anyone, says Michael Gove

What's a disagreement among friends?

Michael Gove is certainly not a traitor and he thinks Theresa May is absolutely the best leader of the Conservative party.

That's according to the cast out Brexiteer, who told the BBC's World At One life on the back benches has given him the opportunity to reflect on his mistakes. 

He described Boris Johnson, his one-time Leave ally before he decided to run against him for leader, as "phenomenally talented". 

Asked whether he had betrayed Johnson with his surprise leadership bid, Gove protested: "I wouldn't say I stabbed him in the back."

Instead, "while I intially thought Boris was the right person to be Prime Minister", he later came to the conclusion "he wasn't the right person to be Prime Minister at that point".

As for campaigning against the then-PM David Cameron, he declared: "I absolutely reject the idea of betrayal." Instead, it was a "disagreement" among friends: "Disagreement among friends is always painful."

Gove, who up to July had been a government minister since 2010, also found time to praise the person in charge of hiring government ministers, Theresa May. 

He said: "With the benefit of hindsight and the opportunity to spend some time on the backbenches reflecting on some of the mistakes I've made and some of the judgements I've made, I actually think that Theresa is the right leader at the right time. 

"I think that someone who took the position she did during the referendum is very well placed both to unite the party and lead these negotiations effectively."

Gove, who told The Times he was shocked when Cameron resigned after the Brexit vote, had backed Johnson for leader.

However, at the last minute he announced his candidacy, and caused an infuriated Johnson to pull his own campaign. Gove received just 14 per cent of the vote in the final contest, compared to 60.5 per cent for May. 


Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.