More Americans are pro-life and more believe abortion should be legal. (Not a typo)

A strange finding by pollsters Gallup.

A rather odd trio of findings by the American pollsters Gallup. The proportion of Americans describing themselves as "pro-choice" has fallen to a record low of 41 per cent:

Yet the proportion who think abortion should be illegal under all circumstances has fallen, while the proportion who think it should be legal under some or all circumstances has stayed flat (though it should be pointed out that the opposite framing is also true; "legal under certain circumstances" is obviously synonymous with "illegal under certain circumstances"):

And the proportion who think abortion is morally wrong hasn't changed:

It's hard to know what to make of the findings. It seems like the most likely reading is that there is a growing proportion of Americans who describe themselves as "pro-life", but are ambivalent about the morality of abortion and think that it should be legal in some circumstances. More conflicting views have been held in the past...

American pro-choice campaigners. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.