Lib Dem MP calls for tax avoidance

Cornish MP Adrian Sanders argues for mass avoidance of pasty tax.

Three weeks on from the Budget, the row over the pasty tax rumbles on. Following yesterday's summit in Truro, Cornish MPs from all three parties are reportedly planning to form a coalition to prevent the measure passing through Parliament. Meanwhile, the Lib Dem MP for Torbay, Adrian Sanders, has openly called for traders to avoid the tax. He writes on his blog:

I think there’s a way round this if every business in Devon & Cornwall stopped selling hot pasties. Once the customer has paid for their cold pasty they hand it back to the shop and ask if they wouldn’t mind putting it in the microwave or in the oven for collection later!

The key is for the shop not to advertise such a service and for us – the pasty eating customers – to ensure we are all in on the secret.

It's a not-so-secret call for mass tax avoidance. Can we expect George Osborne, who has described "aggressive tax avoidance" as "morally repugnant" [even while rewarding it] to come down "like a ton of bricks" on Sanders?

Hat-tip: James Ball.

Lib Dem MP Adrian Sanders called for "every business" in Cornwall to stop selling hot pasties. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Donald Trump promises quick Brexit trade deal - but the pound still falls

The incoming President was talking to cast out Brexiteer, Michael Gove. 

The incoming President, Donald Trump, told the Brexiteer Michael Gove he would come up with a UK-US trade deal that was "good for both sides".

The man who styled himself "Mr Brexit" praised the vote in an interview for The Times

His belief that Britain is "doing great" is in marked contrast to the warning of current President, Barack Obama, that Brexit would put the country "at the back of the queue" for trade deals.

But while Brexiteers may be chuffed to have a friend in the White House, the markets think somewhat differently.

Over the past few days, reports emerged that the Prime Minister, Theresa May, is to outline plans for a "hard Brexit" with no guaranteed access to the single market in a speech on Tuesday.

The pound slipped to its lowest level against the dollar in three months, below $1.20, before creeping up slightly on Monday.

Nigel Green, founder and chief executive of the financial planners deVere Group, said on Friday: "A hard Brexit can be expected to significantly change the financial landscape. As such, people should start preparing for the shifting environment sooner rather than later."

It's hard to know the exact economic impact of Brexit, because Brexit - officially leaving the EU - hasn't happened yet. Brexiteers like Gove have attacked "experts" who they claim are simply talking down the economy. It is true that because of the slump in sterling, Britain's most international companies in the FTSE 100 are thriving. 

But the more that the government is forced to explain what it is hoping for, the better sense traders have of whether it will involve staying in the single market. And it seems that whatever the President-Elect says, they're not buying it.


 

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.