Mehdi Hasan on fighting leaks: Apple vs Labour

Close allies Paul Staines (aka "Guido Fawkes") and Dan Hodges have been blogging all week about chaos, confusion and general goings-on inside the Labour Party based, it seems, on leaks from inside the party's soon-to-be-vacated Victoria HQ in central London.

Yesterday, former Labour special adviser Paul Richards tweeted:

Whoever the person at Labour HQ is who's giving @GuidoFawkes hourly updates, I wish they'd stop it. Whatever the beef, it won't fix it.

My new colleague Alex Hern reminds me of a story told by John Lilly, former CEO of Mozilla, about how the late Steve Jobs of Apple dealt with leakers:

One of the struggles we were going through when [Steve Jobs] came back was that Apple was about the leakiest organization in history -- it had gotten so bad that people were cavalier about it. In the face of all those leaks, I remember the first all company e-mail that Steve sent around after becoming Interim CEO again -- he talked in it about how Apple would release a few things in the coming week, and a desire to tighten up communications so that employees would know more about what was going on -- and how that required more respect for confidentiality. That mail was sent on a Thursday; I remember all of us getting to work on Monday morning and reading mail from Fred Anderson, our then-CFO, who said basically: "Steve sent mail last week, he told you not to leak, we were tracking everyone's mail, and 4 people sent the details to outsiders. They've all been terminated and are no longer with the company.

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.