Undercover: behind the scenes of our Labour Special Issue

How Ben Jennings's cartoon of Ed Miliband and Ed Balls made the front page of the New Statesman.

Hello, and welcome to the second instalment of "Undercover", where I try to explain a bit about how we put our covers together. For the Labour party conference special issue, we decided to try a young cartoonist, Ben Jennings, who won last year's Political Cartoon of The Year award.

I wrote last month about the New Statesman's incredible history as a breeding ground for cartoonists (Martin Rowson, Will Self, the Telegraph's "Matt" and Peter Brookes all got a start here) so it's nice to continue that tradition by giving Ben the cover.

We asked him to draw Ed Miliband and Ed Balls, riffing on the former's focus on communities and patriotism and the latter's ferocious reputation. Here is his initial sketch:

Like last week, we have a flap, so this gives a "reveal" when you lift that up - who is Ed Milband trying to restrain? There are also a couple of small touches, such as Ed Balls's "Butch" collar and Ed Miliband's "predistribution" tattoo. 

Here's the coloured version:

One of the things that's great about Ben's style is the sense of movement you get from those extra lines. The sampled textures in the background are also something of a signature of his (and are usually done on a computer rather than by hand).

Anja Wohlstrom, our art director, and I talked about this, and while we loved the positions, and the expressions (and, in my case, Ed Balls's hair), we felt that it was a bit too red. Not that red isn't a lovely (and Labour-ish) colour, but with a red masthead too, it could all get a bit monochromatic.

So Ben produced a final version, with a park in the background:

Just the place to take a Labour attack dog for a walk. 

Ben Jennings's final artwork for the New Statesman cover.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.