Nightjack: former Times lawyer interviewed under caution

Officers from Operation Tuleta interview Alastair Brett

The New Statesman has learned that Alastair Brett, the former legal manager at the Times, has been interviewed under caution by officers from Operation Tuleta, the Scotland Yard investigation into computer hacking.

The interview took place on 11 September by appointment at a London police station.  Brett was not arrested.  

Brett's interview under caution followed the arrest on 29 August of Patrick Foster, the Times reporter who allegedly hacked into the email account of the NightJack blogger Richard Horton.  

Brett was the in-house lawyer who advised the Times on resisting the privacy injunction application of Horton, and he was closely questioned by Lord Justice Leveson as to his role in the Times outing of Horton.  Brett is also facing an investigation by the Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Horton is currently suing the Times for breach of confidence, misuse of private information, and deceit.


David Allen Green is legal correspondent of New Statesman


David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.