Boris v Paxo: the oddest political interview ever?

<i>Newsnight</i>'s creaky encounter was a lowlight of the conference season.

Last night's Newsnight was real watch-through-your-fingers stuff. It began with a package on "Catgate", which started with a reference to Theresa May's kitten heels; and ended with a group of Tory female activists asking Jeremy Paxman why no men had been asked on the "women's special edition" of the programme.

But the undoubted highlight -- or lowlight, depending on your perspective -- was Boris Johnson's interview with Paxman. The tone was set by Paxman describing his guest as the "hairdresser's despair Boris Johnson" and things only got worse from there.

During the course of the encounter, all the following things happened:

  • Boris Johnson poked Paxman quite hard in the chest.
  • The word "piffle" was used.
  • In a discussion over whether Britain was "broken", Johnson used the camera as an example; leading Paxman to ask him incredulously, "Bits of Britain are scuffed?" (this discussion lasted about a minute).
  • Paxman asked Johnson whether he considered himself the intellectual inferior of David Cameron. "INFERIOR?" chortled Johnson.
  • "I'm trying to help you," said Paxman to Johnson at one point, as if this were the worst therapy session ever.
  • Johnson joked that Cameron was thick because he did PPE (politics, philosophy and economics) at Oxford, rather than Classics.
  • Asked how he differed from Cameron, Johnson replied: "I'm older, I'm heavier . . . I beat him at tennis the other day." When pressed further, he added: "This is a really good 'when did you stop beating your wife?' question."
  • Boris went into an extended rant about how he would volunteer to be Paxman's campaign manager in a run for the Tory leadership.

None of this was helped by the fact that the set creaked ominously throughout, like a galleon in Hornblower. I suspect it might have been straining to get away. Plenty of viewers certainly must have been.

No wonder this encounter was described by Tim Jonze as "the Frost/Nixon we deserve". You can watch it in full here.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.