Boris v Paxo: the oddest political interview ever?

<i>Newsnight</i>'s creaky encounter was a lowlight of the conference season.

Last night's Newsnight was real watch-through-your-fingers stuff. It began with a package on "Catgate", which started with a reference to Theresa May's kitten heels; and ended with a group of Tory female activists asking Jeremy Paxman why no men had been asked on the "women's special edition" of the programme.

But the undoubted highlight -- or lowlight, depending on your perspective -- was Boris Johnson's interview with Paxman. The tone was set by Paxman describing his guest as the "hairdresser's despair Boris Johnson" and things only got worse from there.

During the course of the encounter, all the following things happened:

  • Boris Johnson poked Paxman quite hard in the chest.
  • The word "piffle" was used.
  • In a discussion over whether Britain was "broken", Johnson used the camera as an example; leading Paxman to ask him incredulously, "Bits of Britain are scuffed?" (this discussion lasted about a minute).
  • Paxman asked Johnson whether he considered himself the intellectual inferior of David Cameron. "INFERIOR?" chortled Johnson.
  • "I'm trying to help you," said Paxman to Johnson at one point, as if this were the worst therapy session ever.
  • Johnson joked that Cameron was thick because he did PPE (politics, philosophy and economics) at Oxford, rather than Classics.
  • Asked how he differed from Cameron, Johnson replied: "I'm older, I'm heavier . . . I beat him at tennis the other day." When pressed further, he added: "This is a really good 'when did you stop beating your wife?' question."
  • Boris went into an extended rant about how he would volunteer to be Paxman's campaign manager in a run for the Tory leadership.

None of this was helped by the fact that the set creaked ominously throughout, like a galleon in Hornblower. I suspect it might have been straining to get away. Plenty of viewers certainly must have been.

No wonder this encounter was described by Tim Jonze as "the Frost/Nixon we deserve". You can watch it in full here.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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What do Labour's lost voters make of the Labour leadership candidates?

What does Newsnight's focus group make of the Labour leadership candidates?

Tonight on Newsnight, an IpsosMori focus group of former Labour voters talks about the four Labour leadership candidates. What did they make of the four candidates?

On Andy Burnham:

“He’s the old guard, with Yvette Cooper”

“It’s the same message they were trying to portray right up to the election”​

“I thought that he acknowledged the fact that they didn’t say sorry during the time of the election, and how can you expect people to vote for you when you’re not actually acknowledging that you were part of the problem”​

“Strongish leader, and at least he’s acknowledging and saying let’s move on from here as opposed to wishy washy”

“I was surprised how long he’d been in politics if he was talking about Tony Blair years – he doesn’t look old enough”

On Jeremy Corbyn:

"“He’s the older guy with the grey hair who’s got all the policies straight out of the sixties and is a bit of a hippy as well is what he comes across as” 

“I agree with most of what he said, I must admit, but I don’t think as a country we can afford his principles”

“He was just going to be the opposite of Conservatives, but there might be policies on the Conservative side that, y’know, might be good policies”

“I’ve heard in the paper he’s the favourite to win the Labour leadership. Well, if that was him, then I won’t be voting for Labour, put it that way”

“I think he’s a very good politician but he’s unelectable as a Prime Minister”

On Yvette Cooper

“She sounds quite positive doesn’t she – for families and their everyday issues”

“Bedroom tax, working tax credits, mainly mum things as well”

“We had Margaret Thatcher obviously years ago, and then I’ve always thought about it being a man, I wanted a man, thinking they were stronger…  she was very strong and decisive as well”

“She was very clear – more so than the other guy [Burnham]”

“I think she’s trying to play down her economics background to sort of distance herself from her husband… I think she’s dumbing herself down”

On Liz Kendall

“None of it came from the heart”

“She just sounds like someone’s told her to say something, it’s not coming from the heart, she needs passion”

“Rather than saying what she’s going to do, she’s attacking”

“She reminded me of a headteacher when she was standing there, and she was quite boring. She just didn’t seem to have any sort of personality, and you can’t imagine her being a leader of a party”

“With Liz Kendall and Andy Burnham there’s a lot of rhetoric but there doesn’t seem to be a lot of direction behind what they’re saying. There seems to be a lot of words but no action.”

And, finally, a piece of advice for all four candidates, should they win the leadership election:

“Get down on your hands and knees and start praying”

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.