The Sun gives Cameron a pass on Europe

Where are the cries of betrayal?

Is the Sun going soft? Today's leader on the Lisbon Treaty is uncharacteristically pragmatic. Far from attacking David Cameron's decision to abandon his "cast-iron guarantee" of a referendum, it resignedly accepts the treaty as a "fact of life" and bizarrely declares that the Tory leader "stuck by his original pledge".

The red-top does not even adopt the position taken by David Davis, who today calls for a wider referendum on EU powers to be held within three months of Cameron taking office.

Instead, it argues that the Tories cannot waste precious energy battling the Eurocrats so long as the economic crisis goes on. As ever, the possibility that greater European integration could combat the recession is not considered. Were it not for the euro, Ireland would now be known as Reykjavik-on-Liffey.

Trevor Kavanagh et al insist: "We are not prepared to tie David Cameron's hands just as he is about to take the wheel."

Andy Coulson, who secured the paper's endorsement of the Tories, has clearly persuaded his old Wapping colleagues to go easy on Cameron until he's safely installed in Downing Street.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

GETTY
Show Hide image

The Deep Dive podcast: Mandates and Manifestos

The New Statesman's Deep Dive podcast.

Ian Leslie and Stewart Wood return for another episode of the Deep Dive. This time they're plunging into the murky world of election promises with Catherine Haddon, resident historian at the Institute of Government. Together they explore what an electoral mandate means, what a manifesto is for, and why we can't sue the government when they fail to keep their promises.

Plus: Rant or Rave? Find out which podcasts have had our hosts on tenterhooks.

Listen to this episode of The Deep Dive now:

 

0800 7318496