Cameron hasn't "closed the deal"

Guardian front page ignores signs of Labour comeback

The latest ICM poll offers some good news for Labour. The party has cut the Conservatives' lead by 4 points, rising to its highest level in an ICM poll since April.

But you wouldn't know it looking at the Guardian's front page this morning. The paper proclaims, on the basis of a few non-voting character questions, that David Cameron is "closing the deal" and that voters now see him as "PM-in-waiting". It's not surprising that Cameron leads Brown on the question of who would be a "good prime minister", but we don't live in a presidential system, and so the election may not be won or lost on that basis.

Given that Labour is eating into the Tories' poll lead (and could deny Cameron a working majority even though 10 points behind), it's rather premature to declare that the Tory leader is "closing the deal".

Over at PoliticalBetting, Mike Smithson suggests that the paper's deferential coverage could be a reward for Cameron's decision to abandon a referendum on the Lisbon Treaty.

This seems unlikely. Europe is one of the few policy areas on which the Guardian has genuinely attempted to hold the Tory leader to account. The day after his U-turn on Lisbon, the paper led with the French Europe minister's outburst against the "autistic" Tories.

The Guardian's distorted coverage instead reflects the reality that, in the current climate, "Cameron is closing the deal" is a sexier headline than "Labour comeback begins". All papers like to appear on the side of the future. That's the reason several right-wing titles (including, remarkably, the Daily Express) endorsed New Labour. The Guardian, in its own way, is no exception to this rule.

 

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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FTSE 100 plunges after Theresa May signals hard Brexit ahead

The Prime Minister is to lay out her Brexit plan later today. 

The FTSE 100 and the FTSE 250 plummeted this morning after the Prime Minister signalled Brexit will mean leaving the single market.

Theresa May is expected to rule out "partial membership" or any other kind of "half-in, half-out" deal with the EU in a speech later today.

The FTSE 100, the index of the UK's 100 biggest companies, and the FTSE 250 both fell more than 0.3 per cent immediately after opening. 

The worst performers included the housebuilder Barratt Developments, consumer goods tester Intertek and the mining company BHP.

Stock markets have been buoyant since Brexit, in part because many of Britain's biggest companies are international and benefit from a devalued pound. 

However, while markets fell, the pound crept up against the dollar, to $1.21. 

Critics of the Prime Minister say she is sacrificing the economy to prioritise immigration controls.

TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady warned: "If we leave the single market, working people will end up paying the price. It'd be bad for jobs, for work rights & for our living standards."

According to the Office for National Statistics, inflation rose from 1.2 per cent in November to 1.6 per cent in December. 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.