Has the mansion tax backfired?

Delegates are concerned the policy was "bounced" on leading Lib Dems

From Bournemouth

Vince Cable's "mansion tax" went down well with the left of the party yesterday. But there's palpable anger among some delegates at the way the policy was bounced on the conference and on some leading Lib Dems.

It emerged this morning that Julia Goldsworthy, the party's communities and local government spokesperson, who is responsible for local taxation policy, had not been informed of the policy change.

Many now feel that the confusion over the property tax -- is it temporary or permanent? Will properties be revalued? -- could have been avoided through a more open discussion prior to the conference.

The Liberal Democrats pride themselves on their image as the most democratic and open of the main parties, but activists increasingly fear that, like Labour and the Tories earlier, ever more power is being transferred to the leader's office.

I'm off to watch Vince Cable and Charles Clarke in action on the fringe now. Clarke is the only Labour figure I've seen in Bournemouth and he's always been open to discussion with Nick Clegg's party. But as the Lib Dems turn their guns on the Tories, where does he now stand on a possible coalition? We should find out.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.