Today's comment: Five of the Best

In the Guardian Peter Preston fast forwards to 2010 and the disastrous consequences of David Cameron's Euroscepticism.

Boris Johnson urges his Telegraph colleague Simon Heffer to make good on his pledge to stand for Parliament and ensure he does not "rust in his silo, an unfired nuclear weapon."

The Independent's Robert Fisk on Israel's alleged Lebanese spy ring and the risk that Hezbollah might win next week's election.

The BNP will fracture and fall into irrelevance if it wins seats in the European Parliament, predicts Ross Clark.

Jackie Ashley on why Paddy Ashdown's dream of a centre-left alliance may be closer than ever.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.