Opinionomics | 16 May 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Grexit! Grexit! Grexit!

1. Economic update – May 2012: Osborne’s austerity strangles Britain (Left Foot Forward)

Tony Dolphin presents his comprehensive monthly assessment of the economic situation.

2. An equality multiplier? (Stumbling and Mumbling)

Chris Dillow looks at the possibility that equality breeds equality, and asks what this means for social policy.

3. Is Germany bluffing on Greece? (Bruegel)

Philine Schuseil rounds up the German-language press response to the possibility of Grexit.

4. How Keynes would solve the eurozone crisis (Financial Times)

Marcus Miller and Robert Skidelsky write that for a country in such desperate straits as Greece, orderly exit from the euro to regain competitiveness looks to be the best option.

5. German voters must break the Merkel mindset that got them into this (Guardian)

Greece's euro membership was as much the German elite's fault as anyone's. Can it find the leadership to resolve the crisis, asks Robin Wells

Angela Merkel murmurs to Francois Hollande. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Labour to strip "abusive" registered supporters of their vote in the leadership contest

The party is asking members to report intimidating behaviour - but is vague about what this entails. 

Labour already considered blocking social media users who describe others as "scab" and "scum" from applying to vote. Now it is asking members to report abuse directly - and the punishment is equally harsh. 

Registered and affiliated supporters will lose their vote if found to be engaging in abusive behaviour, while full members could be suspended. 

Labour general secretary Iain McNicol said: “The Labour Party should be the home of lively debate, of new ideas and of campaigns to change society.

“However, for a fair debate to take place, people must be able to air their views in an atmosphere of respect. They shouldn’t be shouted down, they shouldn’t be intimidated and they shouldn’t be abused, either in meetings or online.

“Put plainly, there is simply too much of it taking place and it needs to stop."

Anyone who comes across abusive behaviour is being encouraged to email validation@labour.org.uk.

Since the bulk of Labour MPs decided to oppose Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, supporters of both camps have traded insults on social media and at constituency Labour party gatherings, leading the party to suspend most meetings until after the election. 

In a more ominous sign of intimidation, a brick was thrown through the window of Corbyn challenger Angela Eagle's constituency office. 

McNicol said condemning such "appalling" behaviour was meaningless unless backed up by action: “I want to be clear, if you are a member and you engage in abusive behaviour towards other members it will be investigated and you could be suspended while that investigation is carried out. 

“If you are a registered supporter or affiliated supporter and you engage in abusive behaviour you will not get a vote in this leadership election."

What does abusive behaviour actually mean?

The question many irate social media users will be asking is, what do you mean by abusive? 

A leaked report from Labour's National Executive Committee condemned the word "traitor" as well as "scum" and "scab". A Labour spokeswoman directed The Staggers to the Labour website's leadership election page, but this merely stated that "any racist, abusive or foul language or behaviour at meetings, on social media or in any other context" will be dealt with. 

But with emotions running high, and trust already so low between rival supporters, such vague language is going to provide little confidence in the election process.