Nick Clegg: Plan B "not a Plan B"

DPM denies priorities have changed.

In an interview with the Financial Times, Nick Clegg has signaled that the coalition government will take on board the criticisms of the IMF and launch a "massive" push for growth, but has denied that the plan is a "Plan B", "insisting," the FT report, "the coalition’s deficit reduction plan had earned Britain market credibility."

In the interview, Clegg said that the government's "absolute priority" was to use the government's position as the holder of extremely cheap funds to inject credit into the economy, "massively amplifying the principle of what we did on credit easing". This chimes perfectly with the IMF's advice to ease monetary policy, but there is less word from Clegg as to whether or not he will take up the recommendation to perform fiscally neutral "growth-friendly" policies of infrastructure spending.

The Deputy Prime Minister denies, however, that the plan is in response to the IMF, saying:

From the top of government, a few weeks ago we decided this was the route we’re going to take. That’s the instruction we’ve issued to the Treasury.

And rather than accepting the accusation that the UK's switch from deficit reduction at all costs to a slower paced plan involving, in the Prime Minster's words, "radical" monetary policy and some fiscal looseness represents a Plan B (which George Osborne famously said didn't exist), Clegg instead seems to claiming that the prior tough talk was all an act. Apparently the coalition had no choice but to set out:

In very lurid terms the state of the emergency we were facing... That kind of language over a prolonged period of time can have a dampening effect on mood, which is very important in an economy.

Language or not, Plan B or not, something has definitely changed.

Nick Clegg speaks as David Cameron looks on. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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France to bulldoze Calais Jungle days after child refugees arrive in the UK

The camp houses thousands. 

Refugees and migrants in Calais began queuing up for buses this morning as the French authorities plan to demolish the "Jungle" camp.

But activists fear that, unless France significantly speeds up its asylum process, the displaced people will simply move to other camps along the northern French coast.

Meanwhile, the first children of Calais brought to the UK under the Dubs Amendment arrived at the weekend.

The camp known as the Jungle, in a wasteland by the port of Calais, is actually the latest manifestation in a series of camps established since 1999, when a French reception centre became too crowded.

However, it has swelled as a result of the refugee crisis, and attempts by residents to sneak onto lorries entering the Channel Tunnel have become daily occurences. The French authorities bulldozed part of it earlier this year.

Ahead of the latest demolishment, which is expected to happen on Tuesday, Clare Moseley, founder of Care4Calais, said: “In February this year over 50 per cent of the camp was demolished and yet six months later the camp is bigger than it has ever been before. 

"This is clear evidence that demolitions do not act as a deterrent.  The refugees come because they have no choice."

Future refugees will go to other camps with even less facilities, she warned.

The camp houses thousands of residents, but because of the authorities' unwillingness to legitimise it, there is no official presence. Instead, the residents must rely on volunteer aid services and have little means to stop intruders entering. 

Although conditions in the camp can be dire, residents have created a high street with basic tent shops and restaurants catering to the needs of its displaced population. Many of those in the camp say they are there because they hope to be reunited with family in Britain, or they have given up on ever being processed by the French authorities. 

After the UK government was pressurised into passing the Dubs Amendment, which provides sanctuary to unaccompanied child refugees, some children from the camp have arrived in the UK. The first group is reportedly mostly girls from Eritrea, who will be processed at a UK immigration centre.

One of the MPs crucial to ensuring the Dubs Amendment delivered, Stella Creasy, said many more still needed help. 

Children reunited with their families under the Dublin Convention arrived in the UK last week, although their arrival was overshadowed by a debate over age checks.  

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.