Opinionomics | 13 April 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring oil, Osborne and old people.

1. How Detroit’s adapting to higher gas prices, in one chart (Washington Post | Wonkblog)

Brad Plumer shows that, unlike in 2008, American car manufacturers are finally adapting to high oil prices.

2. The Downside to Longer Life (Slate | Moneybox)

If we all live longer, pensions will become more expensive! Isn't that a tragedy? Well, no.

3. The Swiss boson (Financial Times | alphaville)

"The Swiss boson is a hypothetical condition which is supposed to account for why the Swiss franc has ‘mass’ when all other neighbouring currencies don’t."

4. Any other Chancellor would be seeing the door by now (Tax Research UK)

Richard Murphy asks why Osborne has handled the charity clampdown, the pasty tax and, well, everything so badly.

5. On tax avoidance, allow me to leap to the defence of the super-rich (Guardian)

Nick Hytner, the director of the National Theatre, argues in favour of those "dodging" tax by giving to charity.

A South Korean activist in a Kim Jong-Un mask holds up a fake rocket. Stocks rose across east Asia on the news that North Korea's launch had failed. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.