Economics lookahead, w/c 2 April

Featuring statistics, and lots of them.

Monday

  • The Chartered Institute of Purchasing & Supply, in conjunction with Markit, releases the Manufacturing PMI (Purchasing Managers Index), a monthly survey of the manufacturing sector. The index is a reliable predictor of growth or shrinkage in its sector.
  • CBI & PwC releases its quarterly financial services survey, a pretty thorough overview of the state of the financial services sector...
  • ... and Deloitte releases its nationwide survey of chief financial officers of major UK companies. Together, these two reports form a strong overview of the views of the major customers and providers in the financial sector.

Tuesday

  • British Chambers of Commerce releases its quarterly economic survey, which covers businesses across the UK.
  • Demos are hosting a talk by Gareth Thomas MP (Labour, Harrow West) on 'Social Finance and Early Action'.

Wednesday

  • The Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) is meeting, and will announce whether or not it will raise interest rates from 0.5 per cent on Thursday. Spoiler warning: It probably won't. Also covered will be the size of the quantitative easing programme, which currently stands at £325bn.
  • The European Central Bank will also decide whether to raise the Eurozone's interest rate from 1 per cent, and will annouce its decision at 3:30 UK time.
  • Finally, the British Retail Consortium releases its monthly shop price index, an alternate measure of inflation.

Thursday

  • The Bank of England announces its decision (see above).
  • National Institute of Economic & Social Research (NIESR) releases its monthly GDP estimates at 3:00pm, likely to include an updated version of this chart.
  • The Office of National Statistics will release the monthly industrial production statistics.
  • Halifax releases its house price index.

Friday

  • The American employment report is released.
  • It's Good Friday. Go home.
US employment report is released on Friday. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.