Opinionomics: must-read analysis and comment

Featuring Marx, bank runs, and an unusual type of job creation.

1. The Age of the Shadow Bank Run (New York Times)

Tyler Cowen writes about the return of the bank run to modern finance.

2. Supreme Court and the business of waiting in line (Washington Post WonkBlog)

Sara Kliff writes about a quirk caused by the most important Supreme Court case in a generation.

3. This disgraceful budget smacks of incompetence and cowardice (Guardian Comment is Free)

This budget, this government, "is a ship of fools with the deluded at the helm," writes Will Hutton

4. Marx, capitalists and the state (Stumbling and Mumbling)

Chris Dillow examines the phrase "the executive of the modern state is but a committee for managing the common affairs of the whole bourgeoisie".

5. When austerity is self-defeating (Slate Moneybox)

Matt Yglesias reports on a new paper all about austerity, and the failings thereof.

A woman in a poncho waits in line for the Supreme Court. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.