SFTW: Tasha's Game

In this week's <em>Something for the Weekend</em>, Iain Simons is charmed by a gentle world of games

One of the least prolific but most loved studios to emerge in the last decades has been Double Fine Productions, formed in San Francisco by Tim Schafer after leaving his illustrious career at Lucasarts. Double Fine have so far only shipped one title, the critically acclaimed ‘Psychonauts’, but have developed a reputation for being one of the most personable, relaxed and downright fun places to work.

The Double Fine site is conspicuous evidence of this. The company blog recounts stories of the contents of the studio fridge, they have a successful line of employee produced web-comics and occasionally their staff post up a free game("Just like our regular games, but less!")

This week then, I’m directing you toward a small but perfectly formed flash-game by animator Tasha Harris called, Tasha’s Game.

It’s a simple, colourful affair in which you control Tasha (and her cat, Snoopy) in an attempt to free her imprisoned co-workers from an indistinct but still utterly unpleasant foe. The game has a fun central mechanic, in which progress is made by the arrangement of platforms within the level - enabling you to reach your colleagues. You’re gently guided along the way by comedically friendly instructions and encouragement from the environment - who doesn’t want to be congratulated by a rainbow?

Drawn and animated in the style of Tasha’s webcomic, it’s a charming treat that makes you wish you worked in San Francisco.

Play Tasha’s Game?

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Karen Bradley as Culture Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

The most politically charged of the culture minister's responsibilities is overseeing the BBC, and to anyone who works for - or simply loves - the national broadcaster, Karen Bradley has one big point in her favour. She is not John Whittingdale. Her predecessor as culture secretary was notorious for his belief that the BBC was a wasteful, over-mighty organisation which needed to be curbed. And he would have had ample opportunity to do this: the BBC's Charter is due for renewal next year, and the licence fee is only fixed until 2017. 

In her previous job at the Home Office, Karen Bradley gained a reputation as a calm, low-key minister. It now seems likely that the charter renewal will be accomplished with fewer frothing editorials about "BBC bias" and more attention to the challenges facing the organisation as viewing patterns fragment and increasing numbers of viewers move online.

Of the rest of the job, the tourism part just got easier: with the pound so weak, it will be easier to attract visitors to Britain from abroad. And as for press regulation, there is no word strong enough to describe how long the grass is into which it has been kicked.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.