SFTW: Somersault Game

Every week Iain Simons chooses a game for you to while away a few hours at your desk. This time it's

Ordinarily I wouldn’t put forward games that required a further plug-in, but this is well worth the effort.

Somersault is on the surface a simple bouncing ball game in which you guide a character through a course, traversing all manner of hazards to reach your goal. What sets it apart though, is the control scheme with which you drive the ball. Strokes of the mouse allow you to draw a paddle on screen, and keeping the button pressed allows you to swing the paddle on its end batting the ball around. Helpfully, the projected path of your ball is drawn ahead of you in rainbow-coloured lines - it’s fair to say that without those guides there the game would be a frustrating experience.

The game enjoys a simple, clean aesthetic which looks a lot like the early VR environments of a few years ago and has plenty of fun with its environment design. As Bally makes his way through a the kitchen level, wine glasses are toppled, knives are unsheathed and if you’re very unlucky you might find yourself in a blender faced with the question, ‘will it blend?’ The answer probably won’t please you…

Play Somersault Game

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.