Powder Game

Every week Iain Simons gives you something to while away the hours. This week it's Powder Game. Enjo

Relax. Unlike last week's entry, this is just pure experimentation.

The word ‘interactive’ is bandied around a lot these days, being applied to everything from television to whiteboards - Powder Game is the real thing. A java web-application that’s a simple or as complex as you want it to be, giving you a wide set of wildly varied tools and inviting you to play with them and see what emerges.

Divided into two halves, the bottom of the screen gives you simple descriptions of the options available to you which you paint onto the top half with the mouse. For example, you place water on the screen, and it falls to the ground unless contained within a appropriate vessel. A seed, when planted, will grow - as long as it’s fed water.

Fireworks and gunpowder simply fall to the floor, unless you apply some fire to them…

Its potential as a deeply complex space to experiment in is best demonstrated by a look at some of the creations that other players have already made within it. These can be viewed here and are well worth a browse to get a sense of the power of the application.

Play Powder Game

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.