Friday Arts Diary

Our cultural picks for the week ahead.

Art

National Gallery, London WC2, Leonardo Da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan until 5 December

This long-awaited exhibition is the most complete display of Leonardo's rare surviving paintings and drawings ever held. It focuses on Da Vinci's commitment to represent the human form. The exciting exhibition includes a near-contemporary, full-scale copy of The Last Supper, on loan from the Royal Academy.

Comedy

The O2, London SE1, Allah Made Me Funny 11 November

Due to public demand after a sold out show at HMV Hammersmith Apollo in 2009, Allah Made Me Funny returns for the "World Domination Tour" this November. The show uses stand up comedy to challenge social prejudices on religion. Special guests will make an appearance too.

Music

Koko, London NW1, Guillemots 17 November

The British indie band, formed in November 2004 by Fyfe Dangerfield, are making Camden the last stop of their UK tour, with tickets priced at £17.50 each. The tour follows the critically acclaimed third album Walk the River of April 2011.

Theatre

National Theatre, London SE1, Collaborators until 31 March 2012

The screenwriter John Hodge, best known for Trainspotting, makes his theatre debut. Set in Moscow in 1938, the play imagines what happened when Bulgakov was forcibly commissioned to write a play to celebrate Stalin's 60th birthday. Inspired by historical events, the play is often surreal and enters the imagination of the writer as he loses himself in a hilarious and disturbing relationship with Stalin. Alex Jennings plays Bulgakov and Simon Russell Beale plays Stalin.

Talks

Frontline Club, London W2, Reflections: Alex Crawford 17 November

A Sky News Special Correspondent since 1989, Alex Crawford was the first journalist to make it into Tripoli after it fell to rebel forces. After she travelled with rebel forces, her coverage in Libya won her widespread acclaim. Crawford will discuss her fascinating career as a foreign correspondent with the former BBC executive Vin Ray.

Show Hide image

Why a Keeping Up with the Kardashians cartoon would make genuinely brilliant TV

The Kardashians are their own greatest satirists.

You’ve seen Keeping Up with the Kardashians, Kourtney and Kim Take Kyoto, and Kylie and Kendall Klarify Kommunications Kontracts, but the latest Kardashian show might take a step away from reality. Yes, Kartoon Kardashians could be on the way. According to TMZ, an animated cartoon is the next Kardashian television property we can expect: the gossip website reports that Kris Jenner saw Harvey Weinstein’s L.A. production company earlier this month for a pitch meeting.

It’s easy to imagine the dramas the animated counterparts of the Kardashians might have: arguments over who gets the last clear plastic salad bowl? Moral dilemmas over whether or not to wear something other than Balenciaga to a high profile fashion event? Outrage over the perceived betrayals committed by their artisanal baker?

If this gives you déjà vu, it might be because of a video that went viral over a year ago made using The Sims: a blisteringly accurate parody of Keeping Up with the Kardashians that sees the three sisters have a melodramatic argument about soda.

It’s hysterical because it clings onto the characteristics of the show: scenes opening with utter banalities, sudden dramatic music coinciding with close-ups of each family member’s expressions, a bizarre number of shots of people who aren’t speaking, present tense confessionals, Kim’s ability to do an emotional 0-60, and Kourtney’s monotonous delivery.

But if the Kardashians, both as a reality TV show and celebrity figures, are ripe for ridicule, no one is more aware of it than the family themselves. They’ve shared teasing memes and posted their own self-referential jokes on their social channels, while Kim’s Kimoji app turned mocking viral pictures into self-depreciating in-jokes for her fans. And the show itself has a level of self-awareness often misinterpreted as earnestness - how else could this moment of pure cinema have made it to screen?

The Kardashians are their own greatest satirists, and they’ve perfected the art of making fun of themselves before anyone else can. So there’s a good chance that this new cartoon won’t be a million miles away from “Soda Drama”. It might even be brilliant.

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.