Competition: The Debt

Win a pair of tickets to see Helen Mirren in a new thriller at the Front Line Club.

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To celebrate the release of the political thriller The Debt, starring Helen Mirren and in cinemas on 30 September, the New Statesman is offering one lucky reader the chance to attend, with a companion, an exclusive preview screening of the film at members-only London media club The Frontline on 8 September.

The Debt was filmed on location in Tel Aviv, the UK and Budapest. The screenplay, by Matthew Vaughn & Jane Goldman and Peter Straughan, is adapted from the 2007 Israeli film Ha-Hov [The Debt]. At the 2011 Beaune International Thriller Film Festival, The Debt was honoured with the Special Police [Jury] Prize.

The story begins in 1997, as shocking news reaches retired Mossad secret agents Rachel (played by Academy Award winner Helen Mirren) and Stephan (two-time Academy Award nominee Tom Wilkinson) about their former colleague David (Ciarán Hinds, who also appears in the upcoming film adaptation of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy). All three have been venerated for decades by Israel because of the secret mission that they embarked on for their country back in 1965-1966, when the trio (portrayed, respectively, by Jessica Chastain [The Tree of Life, The Help], Marton Csokas [The Lord of the Rings, Dream House], and Sam Worthington [Avatar, Clash of the Titans]) tracked down Nazi war criminal Dieter Vogel (Jesper Christensen of Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace), the feared "Surgeon of Birkenau", in East Berlin. While Rachel found herself grappling with romantic feelings during the mission, the net around Vogel was tightened by using her as bait.

At great risk, and at considerable personal cost, the team's mission was accomplished - or was it? The suspense builds across two different time periods, with startling action and surprising revelations that compel Rachel to take matters into her own hands.

The Debt is released in UK cinemas on 30 September
More information on The Frontline Club here.

For your chance of winning this prize, answer this simple question:
Name the Academy Award nominee director behind The Debt:
A) John Madden
B) Woody Allen
C) Ron Howard

Email your answer to alice.gribbin@newstatesman.co.uk

Entries close at 5pm on 5 September

 

© 2011 Universal Studios / Focus Features LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Terms and Conditions
- Competition open to UK residents only
- Prize does not include accommodation or travel
- Preview screening will take place in London's The Frontline members only club at 7pm

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Karen Bradley as Culture Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

The most politically charged of the culture minister's responsibilities is overseeing the BBC, and to anyone who works for - or simply loves - the national broadcaster, Karen Bradley has one big point in her favour. She is not John Whittingdale. Her predecessor as culture secretary was notorious for his belief that the BBC was a wasteful, over-mighty organisation which needed to be curbed. And he would have had ample opportunity to do this: the BBC's Charter is due for renewal next year, and the licence fee is only fixed until 2017. 

In her previous job at the Home Office, Karen Bradley gained a reputation as a calm, low-key minister. It now seems likely that the charter renewal will be accomplished with fewer frothing editorials about "BBC bias" and more attention to the challenges facing the organisation as viewing patterns fragment and increasing numbers of viewers move online.

Of the rest of the job, the tourism part just got easier: with the pound so weak, it will be easier to attract visitors to Britain from abroad. And as for press regulation, there is no word strong enough to describe how long the grass is into which it has been kicked.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.