New Statesman screening at BFI Southbank

A few tickets still available for No Man's Land and panel discussion.

A reminder of the New Statesman film screening and panel discussion at the BFI Southbank in London tomorrow (13 February).

Danis Tanovic's 2001 film No Man's Land will be shown in NFT2 at 12.45pm. A panel discussion on the way the media handle conflict, chaired by the New Statesman's culture editor, Jonathan Derbyshire, will follow at 2.30pm.

Panellists:

James Gow is professor of international peace and security at King's College London, and director of the International Peace and Security Programme. Between 1994 and 1998, he served as an expert adviser and expert witness for the Office of the Prosecutor at the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, where he was involved in establishing subject-matter jurisdiction. He was also the first witness to give evidence in the Trial Chamber and the first person ever to give evidence at an international criminal tribunal. Professor Gow has subsequently continued to work with the tribunal. His most recent book is War, Image, Legitimacy: Viewing Contemporary Conflict (with Milena Michalski).

Dr Gregory Kent has written about the break-up of Yugoslavia both as a journalist and as an academic. He is the author of Framing War and Genocide: British Policy and Media Reaction to the War in Bosnia. As director of graduate studies in human rights and international relations at Roehampton University, London, his broad research interests include historical and political issues in war and genocide, and the problems of political communication in such contexts.

James Rodgers is Europe regional editor at the BBC World Service. He spent ten years as a foreign correspondent, during which time he reported from Chechnya, Gaza -- where he was the only international correspondent permanently based in the territory -- and Iraq, where he was one of the first journalists to get to Saddam Hussein's bunker following the Iraqi dictator's capture in 2003. He is currently writing a book on conflict reporting.

To receive a complimentary ticket, email events@newstatesman.co.uk

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“Minoan pendant”: a new poem by Mark Granier

“Yes – I press my nose / to the pleasantly warm glass – / it’s a copy of one I saw / cased in the cool museum”

Yes – I press my nose
to the pleasantly warm glass –
it’s a copy of one I saw
cased in the cool museum –
gold beaten to honey, a grainy
oval dollop, flanked by two
slim symmetrical bees –

garland for a civilisation’s
rise and collapse, eye-dropped
five thousand years: a flash
of evening sun on a windscreen
or wing mirror – Heraklion’s
scooter-life buzzing and humming –

as I step in to browse, become
mesmerised by the warm
dark eyes of the woman
who gives her spiel and moves
softly and with such grace,
that, after leaving, I hesitate

a moment on the pavement
then re-enter with a question
I know not to ask, but ask
anyway, to hear her voice
soften even more as she smiles
and shakes her hair – no.

Mark Granier is an Irish poet and photographer. He is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Haunt (Salmon).

This article first appeared in the 16 June 2016 issue of the New Statesman, Britain on the brink