New Statesman screening at BFI Southbank

A few tickets still available for No Man's Land and panel discussion.

A reminder of the New Statesman film screening and panel discussion at the BFI Southbank in London tomorrow (13 February).

Danis Tanovic's 2001 film No Man's Land will be shown in NFT2 at 12.45pm. A panel discussion on the way the media handle conflict, chaired by the New Statesman's culture editor, Jonathan Derbyshire, will follow at 2.30pm.

Panellists:

James Gow is professor of international peace and security at King's College London, and director of the International Peace and Security Programme. Between 1994 and 1998, he served as an expert adviser and expert witness for the Office of the Prosecutor at the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, where he was involved in establishing subject-matter jurisdiction. He was also the first witness to give evidence in the Trial Chamber and the first person ever to give evidence at an international criminal tribunal. Professor Gow has subsequently continued to work with the tribunal. His most recent book is War, Image, Legitimacy: Viewing Contemporary Conflict (with Milena Michalski).

Dr Gregory Kent has written about the break-up of Yugoslavia both as a journalist and as an academic. He is the author of Framing War and Genocide: British Policy and Media Reaction to the War in Bosnia. As director of graduate studies in human rights and international relations at Roehampton University, London, his broad research interests include historical and political issues in war and genocide, and the problems of political communication in such contexts.

James Rodgers is Europe regional editor at the BBC World Service. He spent ten years as a foreign correspondent, during which time he reported from Chechnya, Gaza -- where he was the only international correspondent permanently based in the territory -- and Iraq, where he was one of the first journalists to get to Saddam Hussein's bunker following the Iraqi dictator's capture in 2003. He is currently writing a book on conflict reporting.

To receive a complimentary ticket, email events@newstatesman.co.uk

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"Samphire": a poem by Alison Brackenbury

"Yet how it waved, in coast’s late light. . . ."

My grandmother could cook it, for
she grew up by that dangerous shore
where the sea skulked without a wall

where I have seen it, tough as grass,
where silent men with rods trooped past
its salty ranks, without a glance.

Lear’s gatherer hangs perilously.
Why? So much is closed to me.
Did Shakespeare ever hear the sea?

Once, said my father, far inland,
from friend or stall, one clutch was found,
steamed, in my grandmother’s great pan.

Once, a smooth leaflet from a shop
claimed they could “source it”, but they stocked
bunched, peppered cress – Another gap.

Yet how it waved, in coast’s late light,
stalks I will never taste, could make
tenderly dark, my coast’s sly snake,
salt on my tongue, before I wake.

Alison Brackenbury is an award-winning poet. Her ninth collection, Skies, will be published by Carcanet in March

This article first appeared in the 11 February 2016 issue of the New Statesman, The legacy of Europe's worst battle