New Statesman screening at BFI Southbank

A few tickets still available for No Man's Land and panel discussion.

A reminder of the New Statesman film screening and panel discussion at the BFI Southbank in London tomorrow (13 February).

Danis Tanovic's 2001 film No Man's Land will be shown in NFT2 at 12.45pm. A panel discussion on the way the media handle conflict, chaired by the New Statesman's culture editor, Jonathan Derbyshire, will follow at 2.30pm.

Panellists:

James Gow is professor of international peace and security at King's College London, and director of the International Peace and Security Programme. Between 1994 and 1998, he served as an expert adviser and expert witness for the Office of the Prosecutor at the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, where he was involved in establishing subject-matter jurisdiction. He was also the first witness to give evidence in the Trial Chamber and the first person ever to give evidence at an international criminal tribunal. Professor Gow has subsequently continued to work with the tribunal. His most recent book is War, Image, Legitimacy: Viewing Contemporary Conflict (with Milena Michalski).

Dr Gregory Kent has written about the break-up of Yugoslavia both as a journalist and as an academic. He is the author of Framing War and Genocide: British Policy and Media Reaction to the War in Bosnia. As director of graduate studies in human rights and international relations at Roehampton University, London, his broad research interests include historical and political issues in war and genocide, and the problems of political communication in such contexts.

James Rodgers is Europe regional editor at the BBC World Service. He spent ten years as a foreign correspondent, during which time he reported from Chechnya, Gaza -- where he was the only international correspondent permanently based in the territory -- and Iraq, where he was one of the first journalists to get to Saddam Hussein's bunker following the Iraqi dictator's capture in 2003. He is currently writing a book on conflict reporting.

To receive a complimentary ticket, email events@newstatesman.co.uk

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Karen Bradley as Culture Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

The most politically charged of the culture minister's responsibilities is overseeing the BBC, and to anyone who works for - or simply loves - the national broadcaster, Karen Bradley has one big point in her favour. She is not John Whittingdale. Her predecessor as culture secretary was notorious for his belief that the BBC was a wasteful, over-mighty organisation which needed to be curbed. And he would have had ample opportunity to do this: the BBC's Charter is due for renewal next year, and the licence fee is only fixed until 2017. 

In her previous job at the Home Office, Karen Bradley gained a reputation as a calm, low-key minister. It now seems likely that the charter renewal will be accomplished with fewer frothing editorials about "BBC bias" and more attention to the challenges facing the organisation as viewing patterns fragment and increasing numbers of viewers move online.

Of the rest of the job, the tourism part just got easier: with the pound so weak, it will be easier to attract visitors to Britain from abroad. And as for press regulation, there is no word strong enough to describe how long the grass is into which it has been kicked.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.