Upbeat Tories

Guildford MP Anne Milton files in the small hours from Blackpool where she's found her colleagues in

1am, later than I intended but always the way it goes, just end up meeting loads of people you havent seen for ages. Fantastic atmosphere here with the mood being very up beat - a general election - just bring it on! Doing 2 fringes tomorrow on mental health and safety in the NHS - late for speech writing but the night is yet young for conference goers! Blackpool giving us a super welcome as ever and sea looks fab. Should be doing this blog tomorrow after NHS speech - everyone, particularly those working in health so angry about Gov interference. Good to be here and getting on with it - wonder how soundly Gordon is sleeping?

Anne Milton is MP for Guildford. She entered Parliament in 2005 having become involved in politics in the early nineties. Before that she worked as a nurse. She is married with four children.
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.