Secret diary of a businessperson who is also female

Naked nudity.

The New Statesman's Businessperson Who Is Also Female asks why some women happily prance around naked in the office gym changing room only to then cover up in the presence of men in the boardroom.

Topicality Watch! By coincidence my esteemed peer Board Babe has recently written about a very similar subject over at the Telegraph.

As a woman who is also a businessperson, I have recently spent time in the gym. Maybe it's something to do with the Olympics?!? (Topical). I went to the gym recently, and couldn't help but notice that there were a lot of women in the women's changing room. Women who looked different from each other. Women putting their socks on, women opening and closing lockers. Some of these women had literally no clothes on them at all.

All this got me thinking. Why is it, that in the changing room, women will happily wear no clothes - confident as wood nymphs frolicking in an autumn glade - yet in the boardroom will often "cover themselves" through wearing several layers of clothing (this point is metaphorical)?

In a recent meeting, in which our company announced that half the staff were about to be made redundant, I noticed that many of the women were quiet, with defensive body language, eyes on the floor. I felt like we had returned to the 1950s, or migrated to Saudi Arabia, or been flung forward into some futuristic dystopia where women are quiet/clothed. Where was the "naked ambition" they had shown after real tennis? Surely they could have pulled their socks up (metaphorically), rolled up their sleeves (metaphorically), and come up with some ideas to pull this company up by its boot straps? Why are women so rubbish apart from me?

My advice to women? Be better.

 

Dita Von Teese is almost naked in this picture. Photograph: Getty Images

Businessperson Who Is Also Female is a woman. She is currently enjoying Board Babe, a Telegraph blog by a female who is also a businessperson. Great minds..!!

Photo: Getty
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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.