Met police statement contradicted by video

Does it look like a cyclist "fell off" his bike?

Something happened on the Olympic torch relay as it went through Suffolk yesterday. Here's how the Metropolitan police described it to the BBC:

A male on a pedal cycle attempted to enter the security bubble around the torchbearer. The Met's torch security team prevented him from gaining access to the torchbearer and the male fell off his bike. He immediately got back on his bike and left.

Got that? Now watch the video of the event:

The two simply do not match up. Quite why the Met thought it was acceptable to give a statement when they weren't yet sure of what had happened is unclear. As concerning is the fact that the BBC, despite possessing footage of the event, didn't think it worth while to question the statement in any way.

The attitude of the police seems to have been to issue a statement exonerating officers entirely, then start looking into what actually happened. That may have worked ten years ago, but when those statements are put up alongside instantly available video, it does nothing but erode trust in the police force.

If you know the cyclist in the video, please encourage him to get in touch at alex.hern@newstatesman.co.uk

A cyclist "falls off his bike".

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Benn vs McDonnell: how Brexit has exposed the fight over Labour's party machine

In the wake of Brexit, should Labour MPs listen more closely to voters, or their own party members?

Two Labour MPs on primetime TV. Two prominent politicians ruling themselves out of a Labour leadership contest. But that was as far as the similarity went.

Hilary Benn was speaking hours after he resigned - or was sacked - from the Shadow Cabinet. He described Jeremy Corbyn as a "good and decent man" but not a leader.

Framing his overnight removal as a matter of conscience, Benn told the BBC's Andrew Marr: "I no longer have confidence in him [Corbyn] and I think the right thing to do would be for him to take that decision."

In Benn's view, diehard leftie pin ups do not go down well in the real world, or on the ballot papers of middle England. 

But while Benn may be drawing on a New Labour truism, this in turn rests on the assumption that voters matter more than the party members when it comes to winning elections.

That assumption was contested moments later by Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell.

Dismissive of the personal appeal of Shadow Cabinet ministers - "we can replace them" - McDonnell's message was that Labour under Corbyn had rejuvenated its electoral machine.

Pointing to success in by-elections and the London mayoral election, McDonnell warned would-be rebels: "Who is sovereign in our party? The people who are soverign are the party members. 

"I'm saying respect the party members. And in that way we can hold together and win the next election."

Indeed, nearly a year on from Corbyn's surprise election to the Labour leadership, it is worth remembering he captured nearly 60% of the 400,000 votes cast. Momentum, the grassroots organisation formed in the wake of his success, now has more than 50 branches around the country.

Come the next election, it will be these grassroots members who will knock on doors, hand out leaflets and perhaps even threaten to deselect MPs.

The question for wavering Labour MPs will be whether what they trust more - their own connection with voters, or this potentially unbiddable party machine.