Met police statement contradicted by video

Does it look like a cyclist "fell off" his bike?

Something happened on the Olympic torch relay as it went through Suffolk yesterday. Here's how the Metropolitan police described it to the BBC:

A male on a pedal cycle attempted to enter the security bubble around the torchbearer. The Met's torch security team prevented him from gaining access to the torchbearer and the male fell off his bike. He immediately got back on his bike and left.

Got that? Now watch the video of the event:

The two simply do not match up. Quite why the Met thought it was acceptable to give a statement when they weren't yet sure of what had happened is unclear. As concerning is the fact that the BBC, despite possessing footage of the event, didn't think it worth while to question the statement in any way.

The attitude of the police seems to have been to issue a statement exonerating officers entirely, then start looking into what actually happened. That may have worked ten years ago, but when those statements are put up alongside instantly available video, it does nothing but erode trust in the police force.

If you know the cyclist in the video, please encourage him to get in touch at alex.hern@newstatesman.co.uk

A cyclist "falls off his bike".

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.