A Hain in the neck

As Peter Hain's agony continues, bloggers scramble to uncover further political funding scandals

Following a proud week for the NS, as Derek Pasquill was cleared of breaching the Official Secrets Act, messages of congratulations were posted at Harry’s Place. But the case leads Spyblog to query: “What other politically embarrassing revelations are [the government] keeping secret from the British public?”

While, Obsolete believes the case highlights the injustice of last year’s leaked al-Jazeera memo trial.

In case you’ve missed Peter Hain’s week from Hell, Mark Pack supplies an overview.

Alex Hilton at Labourhome makes a case for the Labour Party to learn from the funding scandals and puts forward a list of eight suggestions for the party to adopt if it is to avoid getting into similar scrapes.

Guido Fawkes suggests the blame goes right to the top. Having received donations totalling £215,705, Gordon Brown must - under Labour Party rules - pay 15% (or £32,335) into central party funds. This he hasn’t yet done, according to the Electoral Commission. Fawkes states this is why Brown has offered his support to Hain, Harriet Harman and Wendy Alexander.

The accusations against Brown mounted. Dizzy Thinks believes he has stumbled upon another failure on Brown’s part to reveal non-cash donations to the Electoral Commission for a website registration and domain name. All of which is angrily refuted by Chris Paul.

As reports emerged of a potential Tory funding scandal, Kerron Cross is quick to drew comparisons between the two parties, for which he is criticised by posters on his own blog.

Anthony Wells at UK Polling Report chronicles the past month in the polls, which makes depressing reading for Labour.

Meanwhile, Hain’s opposite number, Chris Grayling, has been receiving praise from unexpected quarters. Paul Walter at Liberal Burbling notes: “Grayling is the only Conservative politician who does not send me into a rage-fuelled high blood pressure crisis. I actually feel the man might actually be talking some sense and that he's not just saying what he says because he thinks he ought to.

"And of course, he is a member of the organisation of which I am the proud Life Patron - the BOGS (Bald Old Gits' Society).”

Owen Walker is a journalist for a number of titles within Financial Times Business, primarily focussing on pensions. He recently graduated from Cardiff University’s newspaper journalism post-graduate course and is cursed by a passion for Crystal Palace FC.
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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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