Miliband and more

A round-up of some of the highlights from this week's New Statesman...

Don't miss Jason Cowley's in depth interview with Foreign Secretary David Miliband. Caricatured as über-Blairite and reviled by some of those close to the Prime Minister for the leadership challenge that never was, is he destined for the top job?

Michael Harvey meanwhile ponders the changes in British foreign policy post-Blair.

We've got Zoe Williams on how Michelle Obama flummoxed the press.

Jonathan Derbyshire profiles Philip Blond whose 'Red Tory' thesis is seen as a grave threat to Labour.

And economist Irwin Stelzer predicts how the new capitalism will operate post-squeeze.

Fatima Bhutto berates the rulers of Pakistan who want so much to keep America happy while John Pilger reveals how Hollywood censors by omission.

Plus Ian Irvine talks high culture with John Adams, and Daniel Trilling reviews Iain Sinclair's new book - Hackney: That Rose-Red Empire

Ben Davies trained as a journalist after taking most of the 1990s off. Prior to joining the New Statesman he spent five years working as a politics reporter for the BBC News website. He lives in North London.
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.