Miliband and more

A round-up of some of the highlights from this week's New Statesman...

Don't miss Jason Cowley's in depth interview with Foreign Secretary David Miliband. Caricatured as über-Blairite and reviled by some of those close to the Prime Minister for the leadership challenge that never was, is he destined for the top job?

Michael Harvey meanwhile ponders the changes in British foreign policy post-Blair.

We've got Zoe Williams on how Michelle Obama flummoxed the press.

Jonathan Derbyshire profiles Philip Blond whose 'Red Tory' thesis is seen as a grave threat to Labour.

And economist Irwin Stelzer predicts how the new capitalism will operate post-squeeze.

Fatima Bhutto berates the rulers of Pakistan who want so much to keep America happy while John Pilger reveals how Hollywood censors by omission.

Plus Ian Irvine talks high culture with John Adams, and Daniel Trilling reviews Iain Sinclair's new book - Hackney: That Rose-Red Empire

Ben Davies trained as a journalist after taking most of the 1990s off. Prior to joining the New Statesman he spent five years working as a politics reporter for the BBC News website. He lives in North London.
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.