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10 October 2014

Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi win the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize

They win “for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education”.

By New Statesman

The 2014 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai:

At 17, Pakistani education rights activist Malala Yousafzai is the youngest-ever winner of the prize. She first came to global attention in 2012, when a Taliban gunman attempted to assassinate her on her school bus. After surgery and rehabilitation in the UK, she has become an international advocate for access to education, in particular for girls who are denied opportunities to learn.

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Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi, who shares the prize with Yousafzai, is the founder of the Bachpan Bachao Andolan movement. The organisation, which Satyarthi formed in 1980, campaigns against child labour and human trafficking in South Asia.