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  1. Politics
12 August 2021

Our indifference to the fate of Afghanistan’s people may become a source of national shame

The Taliban's recapture of Afghanistan will be one of the dominant stories of the next few months.

By Stephen Bush

The Taliban have captured the city of Ghazni, just 95 miles away from the capital city, Kabul.

Although the consequences of the American withdrawal from Afghanistan are not yet leading news bulletins here, or shaping debate among the British political class (not while there are consumptive alpacas to save), the Taliban’s recapture of Afghanistan will surely become one of the dominant stories of the next few months here in the United Kingdom, just as it is already a major global story.

Thus far, the British government’s indifference to the plight of Afghan interpreters has been something of a minor story: it has been criticised by any number of Conservative backbenchers and opposition MPs of all types, but it hasn’t, yet, become a national scandal.

But as the full horror of what is about to happen and its consequences for the US and UK’s allies are made fully apparent, our indifference to the fate of not only Afghanistan’s interpreters but its people may well become a source of national discussion and shame.

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  1. Politics
12 August 2021

Our indifference to the fate of Afghanistan’s people may become a source of national shame

The Taliban's recapture of Afghanistan will be one of the dominant stories of the next few months.

By Stephen Bush

The Taliban have captured the city of Ghazni, just 95 miles away from the capital city, Kabul.

Although the consequences of the American withdrawal from Afghanistan are not yet leading news bulletins here, or shaping debate among the British political class (not while there are consumptive alpacas to save), the Taliban’s recapture of Afghanistan will surely become one of the dominant stories of the next few months here in the United Kingdom, just as it is already a major global story.

Thus far, the British government’s indifference to the plight of Afghan interpreters has been something of a minor story: it has been criticised by any number of Conservative backbenchers and opposition MPs of all types, but it hasn’t, yet, become a national scandal.

But as the full horror of what is about to happen and its consequences for the US and UK’s allies are made fully apparent, our indifference to the fate of not only Afghanistan’s interpreters but its people may well become a source of national discussion and shame.