Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. World
  2. Europe
1 February 2013updated 27 Sep 2015 5:34am

The Tories’ EU poll bounce is over already – but it’s no surprise

Tory MPs need to remember that just six per cent of voters name the EU as one of the most "important issues" facing Britain.

By George Eaton

It looks the Tory poll bounce that followed David Cameron’s EU referendum pledge was of the “dead cat” variety. The weekend polls showed Labour’s lead had fallen to just six as the Conservatives’ vote share rose to 35 per cent but by the middle of the week it was back at nine. Today’s YouGov poll has the Labour lead at 12, back at the level seen before Cameron’s speech. 

This will come as a surprise to some, but it shouldn’t. As I noted on the day of Cameron’s speech, while voters share the Tories’ euroscepticism, they do not share their obsession with the subject. Polling by Ipsos MORI (see below) shows that just six per cent of voters regard the EU as one of the most “important issues” facing Britain. As Lord Ashcroft writes in a typically astute analysis on ConservativeHome, Cameron’s pledge has “made Tories feel better about being Tories” but it has not “changed anybody’s mind”. 

How important is the EU to voters? Not very

This isn’t to say that Cameron was wrong to make his pledge. It has undoubtedly won some votes back from Ukip and shored up eurosceptic Conservative support. Rather, it is to say that Tory MPs need to remember that the outcome of the next election will be determined by growth, jobs and public services – the issues that matter to most voters. So long as growth remains non-existent and wages remain below inflation, the Tories will struggle to advance. 

Select and enter your email address Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. A weekly newsletter helping you fit together the pieces of the global economic slowdown. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s weekly environment email on the politics, business and culture of the climate and nature crises - in your inbox every Thursday. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A newsletter showcasing the finest writing from the ideas section and the NS archive, covering political ideas, philosophy, criticism and intellectual history - sent every Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
  • Administration / Office
  • Arts and Culture
  • Board Member
  • Business / Corporate Services
  • Client / Customer Services
  • Communications
  • Construction, Works, Engineering
  • Education, Curriculum and Teaching
  • Environment, Conservation and NRM
  • Facility / Grounds Management and Maintenance
  • Finance Management
  • Health - Medical and Nursing Management
  • HR, Training and Organisational Development
  • Information and Communications Technology
  • Information Services, Statistics, Records, Archives
  • Infrastructure Management - Transport, Utilities
  • Legal Officers and Practitioners
  • Librarians and Library Management
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • OH&S, Risk Management
  • Operations Management
  • Planning, Policy, Strategy
  • Printing, Design, Publishing, Web
  • Projects, Programs and Advisors
  • Property, Assets and Fleet Management
  • Public Relations and Media
  • Purchasing and Procurement
  • Quality Management
  • Science and Technical Research and Development
  • Security and Law Enforcement
  • Service Delivery
  • Sport and Recreation
  • Travel, Accommodation, Tourism
  • Wellbeing, Community / Social Services
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy

With Labour back in front, Ed Miliband is in a stronger position to argue that his decision not to match Cameron’s referendum pledge was the right one. While the Tories bang on about Europe, he wants to bang on about growth. Morever, as Raf noted in a prescient post, Miliband doesn’t want the early years of a Labour government to be dominated by an EU referendum.

Conventional wisdom suggested that Miliband’s referendum stance would prove disastrous for Labour – and, once again, he was right to reject conventional wisdom.