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8 November 2012

Archbishop of Canterbury appointment revives Cameron’s class problem

After being accused of running an "old Etonian" elite, the appointment of an Eton-educated Archbishop is awkward for Cameron.

By George Eaton

In the week that David Cameron was accused by former Home Office mandarin Helen Ghosh of surrounding himself with an “old Etonian clique“, the media has been quick to note that Justin Welby, who was revealed today as the new Archbishop of Canterbury, was educated at the school. Significantly, the Telegraph reports that there were “questions over whether an Eton-educated Archbishop would be well received in some quarters” and that these “played a part in delaying the final decision”.

It appears likely, then, that Welby’s education was, if anything, a hindrance, but his appointment, which will be officially announced by Downing Street (although Welby was selected by the 16-member Crown Nominations Commission), will inevitably be cited by some as evidence of favouritism. It will also prompt further discussion about the state of social mobility in Britain. It’s notable that the Prime Minister, the Mayor of London and, now, the head of the Church are all Eton alumni. When was the establishment last so dominated by public school boys?

Welby’s predecessor Rowan Williams is, of course, a former NS guest-editor (you can read his famous editorial attacking the government for pursuing “radical, long-term policies for which no one voted” here). Asked yesterday in Auckland, in what was his final press conference, what advice he would give to his successor he declared that the new Archbishop should preach “with a Bible in one hand and a newspaper in the other”.

“You have to be cross-referencing all the time and saying, ‘How does the vision of humanity and community in the Bible map onto these issues of poverty, privation, violence and conflict?’

“And you have to use what you read in the newspaper to prompt and direct the questions that you put to the Bible: ‘Where is this going to help me?’

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“So I think somebody who likes reading the Bible and likes reading newspapers would be a good start.”